Discover Your Next Read

  • 0 out of 5

    Born on a Tuesday

    by Elnathan John

     

    In far northwestern Nigeria, Dantala lives among a gang of street boys who sleep under a kuka tree. During the election, the boys are paid by the Small Party to cause trouble. When their attempt to burn down the opposition’s local headquarters ends in disaster, Dantala must run for his life, leaving his best friend behind. He makes his way to a mosque that provides him with food, shelter, and guidance. With his quick aptitude and modest nature, Dantala becomes a favored apprentice to the mosque’s sheikh. Before long, he is faced with a terrible conflict of loyalties, as one of the sheikh’s closest advisors begins to raise his own radical movement. When bloodshed erupts in the city around him, Dantala must decide what kind of Muslim—and what kind of man—he wants to be.

    Born on a Tuesday is a stirring, starkly rendered novel about a young boy struggling to find his place in a society that is fracturing along religious and political lines.

    3,500
  • 0 out of 5

    Easy Motion Tourist

    by Leye Adenle

     

    A woman’s mutilated body is discarded by the side of a club near one of the main hotels in Victoria Island. Collins, a bystander, is picked up by the police as a potential suspect. After experiencing the unpleasant realities of a Nigerian police cell, he is rescued by Amaka, a Pam Grier-esque Blaxploitation heroine with a saintly streak. As Collins discovers more of the darker aspects of what makes Lagos tick – including the clandestine trade in organs – he also falls slowly for Amaka. Little do they realise how the body parts business is wrapped up in the power and politics of the city.

    The novel features a motley cast of supporting characters, including a memorable duo of low-level Lagos gangsters, Knockout and Go-Slow. Easy Motion Tourist pulsates with the rhythms of Lagos, reeks of its open drains, and entertains from beginning to end. A modern thriller featuring a strong female protagonist, prepared to take on the Nigerian criminal world on her own.

    3,500
  • 0 out of 5

    Every Day Is For The Thief

    by Teju Cole

     

    Visiting Lagos after many years away, Teju Cole’s unnamed narrator rediscovers his hometown as both a foreigner and a local. Over long, wandering days, the narrator compares present-day Lagos to the Lagos of his memory, and in doing so reveals changes that have taken place in himself.

    1,5002,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Purple Hibiscus

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

     

    Fifteen-year-old Kambili’s world is circumscribed by the high walls and frangipani trees of her family compound. Her wealthy Catholic father, under whose shadow Kambili lives, while generous and politically active in the community, is repressive and fanatically religious at home.

    When Nigeria begins to fall apart under a military coup, Kambili’s father sends her and her brother away to stay with their aunt, a University professor, whose house is noisy and full of laughter. There, Kambili and her brother discover a life and love beyond the confines of their father’s authority. The visit will lift the silence from their world and, in time, give rise to devotion and defiance that reveal themselves in profound and unexpected ways.

    800
  • 0 out of 5

    The Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s Wives

    by  Lola Shoneyin

     

    African-born poet Lola Shoneyin makes her fiction debut with The Secret Lives of Babi Segi’s Wives, a perceptive, entertaining, and eye-opening novel of polygamy in modern-day Nigeria. The struggles, rivalries, intricate family politics, and the interplay of personalities and relationships within the complex private world of a polygamous union come to life in The Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s WivesBig Love and The 19th Wife set against a contemporary African background.

    2,500
  • 0 out of 5

    The Farm

    by Adesuwa Ehinome Iluobe

     

    The Farm is a collection of stories which are reflections on Nigeria and her experiences. The Farm is the lead story, set in a rustic part of Nigeria, an unusual farm records uncommon success and productivity in its operations.

    Separated from her loved ones, Moremi is flung into an unfamiliar world that is highly expectant of her. Amidst fatal changes, bizarre alliances, quest for wealth and love, she finds an unlikely friend in Ugonna. Together they must do their part to ensure continued success of the Farm. With each choice they make, their lives unfolds before them until they stumble upon a shattering revelation that unsettles what little balance there is at the farm.

    In Elusion, Ese and Ibrahim take us on a thrilling journey that highlights the bond between the duo, which introduced them to each other’s peculiarities and uniqueness both in their cultural and religious differences. Their bond further grows into a formidable love tangle that thrives despite the awakening of terrorism in the country.

    Human showcases the struggle of a Mother confronted with protecting her son from the reality of stigmatization and keeping him from battering other children who tease him with as Afin; a term he demands his mother to explain.

    Asabe and Hassanah share a close knit friendship in Residue  that is almost torn apart by insatiable needs and an ailing country.

    The last story One Year is a story of a young girl whose missing friend has caused her family despair and misery.  It was first published by Brittle Paper, a leading African Literary e-mag.

    1,750
  • 0 out of 5

    Nairobi Heat

    by Mũkoma wa Ngũgĩ

     

    A young and beautiful white woman is murdered in the US, and the prime suspect is former Rwandan school headmaster Joshua – a hero who had risked his life to save the innocent during Rwanda’s genocide. Ishmael, an African American detective, must investigate the case by plunging himself into Joshua’s past. He travels to Kenya, where Joshua once lived as a refugee, and finds himself unearthing his own African identity as he uncovers this violent crime.

    Kenyan author Mukoma wa Ngugi’s debut novel is a gripping and hard-hitting detective thriller that questions race, identity and class.

    2,000
  • 0 out of 5

    The Thing Around Your Neck

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

     

    In her most intimate and seamlessly crafted work to date, Adichie turns her penetrating eye on not only Nigeria but America, in twelve dazzling stories that explore the ties that bind men and women, parents and children, Africa and the United States.

    In “A Private Experience,” a medical student hides from a violent riot with a poor Muslim woman whose dignity and faith force her to confront the realities and fears she’s been pushing away. In “Tomorrow is Too Far,” a woman unlocks the devastating secret that surrounds her brother’s death. The young mother at the center of “Imitation” finds her comfortable life in Philadelphia threatened when she learns that her husband has moved his mistress into their Lagos home. And the title story depicts the choking loneliness of a Nigerian girl who moves to an America that turns out to be nothing like the country she expected; though falling in love brings her desires nearly within reach, a death in her homeland forces her to reexamine them.

    1,500
  • 0 out of 5

    Americanah

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

     

    Ifemelu and Obinze are young and in love when they depart military-ruled Nigeria for the West. Beautiful, self-assured Ifemelu heads for America, where despite her academic success, she is forced to grapple with what it means to be black for the first time. Quiet, thoughtful Obinze had hoped to join her, but with post-9/11 America closed to him, he instead plunges into a dangerous, undocumented life in London.

    Fifteen years later, they reunite in a newly democratic Nigeria, and reignite their passion—for each other and for their homeland.

    1,500
  • 0 out of 5

    Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

     

    A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. Dear Ijeawele is Adichie’s letter of response.

    Here are fifteen invaluable suggestions–compelling, direct, wryly funny, and perceptive–for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can “allow” women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It will start a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today.

    1,000
  • 0 out of 5

    The Principles for Priceless Purpose Manifestation

    By Apostle Franklyn Osaro Osakue

    Every man has great gifts and potentails in him that need to be discovered. When it is discovered and engaged with all diligence, with full determination and a mindset to please God with the gift, it will definitely result in success and fulfillment.

    Consequently, a man of purpose must be regulated by revealed divine principles for fulfilment to be realized. the principles in this book are divinely coated to drive purpose to achievement. This book is written to empower men and women with purpose to achieve same as the redemptive design for humanity has settled this issue.

    This book is a must read, if you want to be fulfilled according to the will of God designed for your life. The book will help you to recharge your spiritual strength bank and put you in charge of life affairs. Ultimately, it will influence you in the direction of God’s will for you.

    1,500
  • 0 out of 5

    Ellie and the Cat

    By Malorie Blackman

    Ellie is the rudest, most spoilt child her granma has ever met.  So Granma decides to show Ellie up and switches her body with Jolly the cat’s.  But Ellie is just lonely and as she gets to know the other creatures in the house, she learns she can be a good friend.

    1,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Princess Arabella and the Giant Cake

    By Mylo Freeman

    A new title in the popular ‘Princess Arabella’ series. It is almost Granny’s birthday and Princess Arabella and her friends set out to bake the most DELICIOUS and most GIGANTIC cake in the entire world. But who will be the winner – Princess Arabella, Prince Mimoen, Princess Sophie or Princess Ling?

    A delightful picture book for children aged 3+

    1,750
  • 0 out of 5

    Mayowa and the Masquerades

    By Lola Shoneyin

    Mayowa is unhappy because he has been told he will be visiting his grandmother in Ilisan. When he gets there, grandma pairs him up with the ever-hungry, fun- loving Denuyi. Together, they explore the town and all its wonders. By the time he returns to Lαgos, Mαyowa learns that there is more to life than computer games.

    1,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Kemi’s Journal

    Kemi’s Journal is the story of a twenty-something high-flying London advertising executive. Kemi has to reconcile her new found Christian faith with a demanding career, trying to get over a non-believing ex-boyfriend Zack and living in the shadow of her best friend Vanessa with her perfect fiancé Mark. Kemi’s faith is sometimes very strong and can resist temptations and other times God takes a back seat as the arms of Zack appears more alluring. How does she cope with being a Christian in the cut-throat world of advertising, being intimate with Zack and the joy of a personal relationship with Jesus? This is a bold novel that tackles the moral decisions many young women have to make about crisis of faith, sex before marriage, unplanned pregnancy and abortion with openness, sensitivity and maturity.

    1,000
  • Olasupo Shashore
    0 out of 5

    A Platter of Gold

    Over the course of fifty-four years till the eve of independence, eight colonial pro-consuls governors for the British Empire pitched wit, passion and guile against under-celebrated, sometimes everyday Nigerians – Ahmadu Attahiru I, the Sokoto Caliph and his cavalry, who violently resisted British ouster and occupation; Eleko and the Lagos Chieftains, who first claimed they would “rather die than pay tax”… This is a story of Nigeria’s history as well as the history of Nigeria’s story. The other story!

    10,000
  • 3.00 out of 5

    An Abundance of Scorpions

    by Hadiza Isma El-Rufai

     

    Following a horrific tragedy, Tambaya leaves Kano for Accra to live with her brother, Aminu. Sadly, her dream of a new beginning is dashed when she can no longer endure the indignity she suffers at the hands of her brother’s new wife.

    Tambaya returns to northern Nigeria and soon finds work as a matron in an orphanage, under the watchful eye of the ruthless Miss Scholastica. Just when she begins to settle into her new life, an unexpected visit threatens to destroy everything she has worked so hard to build. Tambaya faces moral dilemmas on all sides, but she must stop her life from unravelling once again.

    Vulnerable, and surrounded by malice, corruption and greed, Tambaya struggles to shape her destiny. An Abundance of Scorpions charts one woman’s journey through grief and uncertainty to a road that leads to self-discovery, redemption and love. 

    3,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Who Fears Death

    by Nnedi Okorafor

     

    An award-winning literary author presents her first foray into supernatural fantasy with a novel of post-apocalyptic Africa.

    In a far future, post-nuclear-holocaust Africa, genocide plagues one region. The aggressors, the Nuru, have decided to follow the Great Book and exterminate the Okeke. But when the only surviving member of a slain Okeke village is brutally raped, she manages to escape, wandering farther into the desert. She gives birth to a baby girl with hair and skin the color of sand and instinctively knows that her daughter is different. She names her daughter Onyesonwu, which means “Who Fears Death?” in an ancient African tongue.

    Reared under the tutelage of a mysterious and traditional shaman, Onyesonwu discovers her magical destiny – to end the genocide of her people. The journey to fulfill her destiny will force her to grapple with nature, tradition, history, true love, the spiritual mysteries of her culture – and eventually death itself.

    3,500
  • 0 out of 5

    What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky

    by Lesley Nneka Arimah

     

    In Who Will Greet You at Home a woman desperate for a child weaves one out of hair, with unsettling results. In Wild, a disastrous night out shifts a teenager and her Nigerian cousin onto uneasy common ground. In The Future Looks Good, three generations of women are haunted by the ghosts of war, while in Light, a father struggles to protect and empower the daughter he loves. And in the title story, in a world ravaged by flood and riven by class, experts have discovered how to “fix the equation of a person” – with rippling, unforeseen repercussions.

    2,500
  • -25%
    0 out of 5

    A Woman’s Body is a Country

    by Dami Ajayi

     

    Dami Ajayi’s second volume of poems, A Woman’s Body is a Country, interrogates the ramifications of affection. A work of impressive artistry, these are poems of life turned inside out, where time cheats on writers, and the people and things at the brunt end of our oppressive pleasures come back to haunt us. Here is the poetry of the quotidian, a philosophic and profound interrogation of relationships, of words, of bodies and their burdens, of times and time.

    2,000 1,500
  • 0 out of 5

    Zahrah the Windseeker

    by Nnedi Okorafor

     

    In the northern Ooni Kingdom, fear of the unknown runs deep, and children born dada are rumored to have special powers. Thirteen-year-old Zahrah Tsami feels like a normal girl — she grows her own flora computer, has mirrors sewn onto her clothes, and stays clear of the Forbidden Greeny Jungle. But unlike other kids in the village of Kirki, Zahrah was born with the telling dadalocks. Only her best friend, Dari, isn’t afraid of her, even when something unusual begins happening — something that definitely makes Zahrah different. The two friends investigate, edging closer and closer to danger. When Dari’s life is threatened. Zahrah must face her worst fears alone, including the very thing that makes her different.
    In this exciting debut novel by Nnedi Okorafor-Mbachu, things aren’t always what they seem — monkeys tell fortunes, plants offer wisdom, and a teenage girl is the only one who stands a chance at saving her best friend’s life.

    1,500
  • 0 out of 5

    What Sunny Saw in the Flames

    by Nnedi Okorafor

     

    What Sunny Saw in the Flames transports the reader to a magical place where nothing is quite as it seems. Born in New York, but living in Aba, Nigeria, thirteen-year-old Sunny is understandably a little lost. She is albino. Her eyes are so sensitive to the sun that she has to wait until evening to play football. Apart from being good at the beautiful game, she has a special gift: she can see into the future. At school, she soon becomes part of a special quartet with unique powers. Together, Sunny, Orlu, Chichi and Sasha explore this exciting realm of strange creatures and dark secrets. The good news is that in this world, your worst defect is actually your greatest asset. But there’s a catch. Someone is kidnapping children and maiming or killing them. The group is asked to help track down the criminal. Will Sunny be able to overcome the killer with powers stronger than her own, or will the future she saw in the flames come to reality?

    2,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Efuru

    by Flora Nwapa

     

    Efuru, beautiful and respected, is loved and deserted by two ordinary undistinguished husbands.

    2,000
  • 0 out of 5

    You Must Set Forth at Dawn

    by Wole Soyinka

     

    In the tough, humane, and lyrical language that has typified his plays and novels, Soyinka captures the indomitable spirit of Nigeria itself by bringing to life the friends and family who bolstered and inspired him, and by describing the pioneering theater works that defied censure and tradition. Soyinka not only recounts his exile and the terrible reign of General Sani Abacha, but shares vivid memories and playful anecdotes–including his improbable friendship with a prominent Nigerian businessman and the time he smuggled a frozen wildcat into America so that his students could experience a proper Nigerian barbecue.
    More than a major figure in the world of literature, Wole Soyinka is a courageous voice for human rights, democracy, and freedom. You Must Set Forth at Dawn is an intimate chronicle of his thrilling public life, a meditation on justice and tyranny, and a mesmerizing testament to a ravaged yet hopeful land.

    6,500
  • 0 out of 5

    The Thing Around Your Neck

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

     

    In her most intimate and seamlessly crafted work to date, Adichie turns her penetrating eye on not only Nigeria but America, in twelve dazzling stories that explore the ties that bind men and women, parents and children, Africa and the United States.

    In “A Private Experience,” a medical student hides from a violent riot with a poor Muslim woman whose dignity and faith force her to confront the realities and fears she’s been pushing away. In “Tomorrow is Too Far,” a woman unlocks the devastating secret that surrounds her brother’s death. The young mother at the center of “Imitation” finds her comfortable life in Philadelphia threatened when she learns that her husband has moved his mistress into their Lagos home. And the title story depicts the choking loneliness of a Nigerian girl who moves to an America that turns out to be nothing like the country she expected; though falling in love brings her desires nearly within reach, a death in her homeland forces her to reexamine them.

    1,500
  • 0 out of 5

    Easy Motion Tourist

    by Leye Adenle

     

    A woman’s mutilated body is discarded by the side of a club near one of the main hotels in Victoria Island. Collins, a bystander, is picked up by the police as a potential suspect. After experiencing the unpleasant realities of a Nigerian police cell, he is rescued by Amaka, a Pam Grier-esque Blaxploitation heroine with a saintly streak. As Collins discovers more of the darker aspects of what makes Lagos tick – including the clandestine trade in organs – he also falls slowly for Amaka. Little do they realise how the body parts business is wrapped up in the power and politics of the city.

    The novel features a motley cast of supporting characters, including a memorable duo of low-level Lagos gangsters, Knockout and Go-Slow. Easy Motion Tourist pulsates with the rhythms of Lagos, reeks of its open drains, and entertains from beginning to end. A modern thriller featuring a strong female protagonist, prepared to take on the Nigerian criminal world on her own.

    3,500
  • 0 out of 5

    Born on a Tuesday

    by Elnathan John

     

    In far northwestern Nigeria, Dantala lives among a gang of street boys who sleep under a kuka tree. During the election, the boys are paid by the Small Party to cause trouble. When their attempt to burn down the opposition’s local headquarters ends in disaster, Dantala must run for his life, leaving his best friend behind. He makes his way to a mosque that provides him with food, shelter, and guidance. With his quick aptitude and modest nature, Dantala becomes a favored apprentice to the mosque’s sheikh. Before long, he is faced with a terrible conflict of loyalties, as one of the sheikh’s closest advisors begins to raise his own radical movement. When bloodshed erupts in the city around him, Dantala must decide what kind of Muslim—and what kind of man—he wants to be.

    Born on a Tuesday is a stirring, starkly rendered novel about a young boy struggling to find his place in a society that is fracturing along religious and political lines.

    3,500
  • 0 out of 5

    Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

     

    A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. Dear Ijeawele is Adichie’s letter of response.

    Here are fifteen invaluable suggestions–compelling, direct, wryly funny, and perceptive–for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can “allow” women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It will start a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today.

    1,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Everything Good Will Come

    by Sefi Atta

     

    It is 1971, a year after the Biafran War, and Nigeria is under military rule—though the politics of the state matter less than those of her home to Enitan Taiwo, an eleven-year-old girl tired of waiting for school to start. Will her mother, who has become deeply religious since the death of Taiwo’s brother, allow her friendship with the new girl next door, the brash and beautiful Sheri Bakare?

    Everything Good Will Come charts the fate of these two African girls, one born of privilege and the other, a lower class “half-caste”; one who is prepared to manipulate the traditional system while the other attempts to defy it.

    3,500
  • -7%
    3.00 out of 5

    Stay With Me

    by Ayobami Adebayo

     

    Yejide and Akin have been married since they met and fell in love at university. Though many expected Akin to take several wives, he and Yejide have always agreed: polygamy is not for them. But four years into their marriage–after consulting fertility doctors and healers, trying strange teas and unlikely cures–Yejide is still not pregnant. She assumes she still has time–until her family arrives on her doorstep with a young woman they introduce as Akin’s second wife. Furious, shocked, and livid with jealousy, Yejide knows the only way to save her marriage is to get pregnant. Which, finally, she does–but at a cost far greater than she could have dared to imagine.

    An electrifying novel of enormous emotional power, Stay With Me asks how much we can sacrifice for the sake of family.

    3,000 2,800

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