• 0 out of 5

    Incidents at the Shrine: Short Stories

    by Ben Okri

     

    Incidents at the Shrine is the first collection of stories by the author of 1991 Booker Prize-winning novel, The Famished Road.

    Whether the subject is a child’s eye view of the Nigerian Civil War, Lagos and the spirit world or dispossession in a decaying British inner city, Okri’s lyrical, poetic and humorous prose recreates the known and the unknown world with startling power.

    4,250
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    Indigo

    by Molara Wood

     

    The arrival of a second wife causes a woman to reassess her marriage… Another faces up to tough choices in the wake of a military coup… A heroine from history lights the path for a modern girl on the road to Jenwi… A picture on a wall tells its own poignant story of sacrifice… A former cultist must confront an unspoken secret in his family…

    From Nigeria to the Diaspora, joy, sadness, anxieties and triumphs fill the canvas with lush, vivid colours. Themes of loss and longing, past and present, home and away, mysticism and modernity, trauma and healing, truth and lies, masculinity and a woman’s place – all are deftly explored in this mesmerising, sometimes devastating collection of short stories.

    2,750
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    Ìsarà: A Voyage Around “Essay”

    by Wole Soyinka

     

    The 1986 winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature–the first African to be awarded the prize–writes a highly incisive and deeply affecting re-creation of colonial Nigeria based on a cache of letters he discovered after his father’s death.

    4,000
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    Lagos: City of the Imagination

    by Kaye Whiteman

     

    Lagos is fast becoming a global city – a place people visit for curiosity and the vibe as much as for business or family. The mesmerising energy and intensity of the city have to be experienced to be understood. But what is the story of Lagos? When did the city begin? Who were the first inhabitants? When did it become the city of iniquity and wisdom that continues to confound all who encounters it? Who have been the key chroniclers of this real yet imaginary city?

    Veteran journalist and writer Kaye Whiteman has given us a gem that answers these questions and more. Lagos: City of the Imagination explains the origins of Lagos as both outpost of the Benin Empire and also the city run by the White Cap Chiefs. Whiteman shows that Lagos was always multicultural and cosmopolitan, with the Portuguese and later educated returnees from Sierra Leone and artisans from Brazil adding to the eclectic mix.

    6,500
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    Like a Mule Bringing Ice Cream to the Sun

    by Sarah Ladipo Manyika

     

     

    Morayo Da Silva, a cosmopolitan Nigerian woman, lives in hip San Francisco. On the cusp of seventy-five, she is in good health and makes the most of it, enjoying road trips in her vintage Porsche, chatting to strangers, and recollecting characters from her favourite novels. Then she has a fall and her independence crumbles. Without the support of family, she relies on friends and chance encounters. As Morayo recounts her story, moving seamlessly between past and present, we meet Dawud, a charming Palestinian shopkeeper, Sage, a feisty, homeless Grateful Dead devotee, and Antonio, the poet whom Morayo desired more than her ambassador husband.
    A subtle story about ageing, friendship and loss, this is also a nuanced study of the erotic yearnings of an older woman

    3,000
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    Longthroat Memoirs: Soups, Sex and Nigerian Taste Buds

    by Yemisi Aribisala

     

    One of the most enduring myths on the Nigerian femme fatale – mammy-water, ‘winch’ or husband-snatcher – has to do with the cooking of fish stew … A woman can do what she likes with a man when she knows how to satisfy his appetite for food. Long throat Memoirs presents a sumptuous menu of essays about Nigerian food, lovingly presented by the nation’s top epicurean writer. As well as a mouth-watering appraisal of the cultural politics and erotics of Nigerian cuisine, it is therefore a series of love letters to the Nigerian palate. From innovations in soup, fish as aphrodisiac and the powerful seductions of the yam, Long Throat Memoirs examines the complexities, the peculiarities, the meticulousness, and the tactility of Nigerian food.

    5,500
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    Love Is Power, or Something Like That: Stories

    by Igoni Barrett

     

    When it comes to love, things are not always what they seem. In contemporary Lagos, a young boy may pose as a woman online, and a maid may be suspected of sleeping with her employer and yet still become a young wife’s confidante. Men and women can be objects of fantasy, the subject of beery soliloquies. They can be trophies or status symbols. Or they can be overwhelming in their need.
    In these wide-ranging stories, A. Igoni Barrett roams the streets with people from all stations of life. A man with acute halitosis navigates the chaos of the Lagos bus system. A minor policeman, full of the authority and corruption of his uniform, beats his wife. A family’s fortunes fall from love and wealth to infidelity and poverty as poor choices unfurl over three generations. With humor and tenderness, Barrett introduces us to an utterly modern Nigeria, where desire is a means to an end, and love is a power as real as money.

    2,500
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    Maru

    by Bessie Head

     

    An orphaned Masarwa girl comes to Dilepe to teach, only to discover that in this remote Botswana village her people are treated as outcasts.

    In the love story and intrigue that follow, the author’s exploration of racism draws upon her own experiences of growing up in South Africa.

    1,000
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    Measuring Time

    by Helon Habila

     

    Mamo and LaMamo are twin brothers living in the small Nigerian village of Keti, where their domineering father controls their lives. With high hopes the twins attempt to flee from home, but only LaMamo escapes successfully and is able to live their dream of becoming a soldier who meets beautiful women. Mamo, the sickly, awkward twin, is doomed to remain in the village with his father. Gradually he comes out of his father’s shadow and gains local fame as a historian, and, using Plutarch’s Parallel Lives as his model, he embarks on the ambitious project of writing a “true” history of his people. But when the rains fail and famine rages, religious zealots incite the people to violence―and LaMamo returns to fight the enemy at home.

    A novel of ardent loyalty, encroaching modernity, political desire, and personal liberation, Measuring Time is a heart-wrenching history of Nigeria, portrayed through the eyes of a single family.

    2,000
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    My Sister The Serial Killer

    by Oyinkan Braithwaite
    Satire meets slasher in this short, darkly funny hand grenade of a novel about a Nigerian woman whose younger sister has a very inconvenient habit of killing her boyfriends.

    “Femi makes three, you know. Three and they label you a serial killer.”

    Korede is bitter. How could she not be? Her sister, Ayoola, is many things: the favourite child, the beautiful one, possibly sociopathic. And now Ayoola’s third boyfriend in a row is dead. Korede’s practicality is the sisters’ saving grace. She knows the best solutions for cleaning blood, the trunk of her car is big enough for a body, and she keeps Ayoola from posting pictures of her dinner to Instagram when she should be mourning her “missing” boyfriend. Not that she gets any credit.

    A kind, handsome doctor at the hospital where Korede works, the bright spot in her life, begins to fall for Ayoola. When he asks Korede for Ayoola’s phone number, she must reckon with what her sister has become and what she will do about it.

    Oyinkan Braithwaite’s first novel is a smorgasbord of wit, genre-bending thrills and quiet melancholy.

    3,500
  • Hot
    0 out of 5

    Nairobi Heat

    by Mũkoma wa Ngũgĩ

     

    A young and beautiful white woman is murdered in the US, and the prime suspect is former Rwandan school headmaster Joshua – a hero who had risked his life to save the innocent during Rwanda’s genocide. Ishmael, an African American detective, must investigate the case by plunging himself into Joshua’s past. He travels to Kenya, where Joshua once lived as a refugee, and finds himself unearthing his own African identity as he uncovers this violent crime.

    Kenyan author Mukoma wa Ngugi’s debut novel is a gripping and hard-hitting detective thriller that questions race, identity and class.

    2,000
  • 0 out of 5

    News from Home

    by Sefi Atta

     

     

    From Zamfara up country, to the Niger Delta down south, with a finale in Africa’s most populous city, Lagos, this collection of stories and a novella are inspired by newspaper headlines and narrated by a range of Nigerian voices that are elevated to the realm of the sublime by Sefi Atta’s distinctive, clinical narrative skill.

    3,500
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    No Longer at Ease (The African Trilogy, #2)

    by Chinua Achebe

     

    Obi Okonkwo is an idealistic young man who has now returned to Nigeria for a job in the civil service. However in his new role he finds that the way of government seems to be corruption. Obi manages to resist the bribes offered to him, but when he falls in love with an unsuitable girl, he sinks further into emotional and financial turmoil.

    1,000
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    One Day I Will Write About This Place

    by Binyavanga Wainaina

     

    In this vivid and compelling debut memoir, Wainaina takes us through his school days, his mother’s religious period, his failed attempt to study in South Africa as a computer programmer, a moving family reunion in Uganda, and his travels around Kenya.

    2,000
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    Swallow

    by Sefi Atta

     

    It is the mid-1980s in Lagos and the government’s War Against Indiscipline and austerity measures are fully in operation. Tolani Ajao is a secretary working at Federal Community Bank. A succession of unfortunate events leads Tolani’s roommate and colleague, Rose, to consider drug trafficking as an alternative means of making a living. Tolani’s subsequent struggle with temptation forces her to reconsider her morality and that of her mother Arike’s, as she embarks on a turbulent journey of self-discovery.

    Their story, narrated by mother and daughter, is a tribute to Nigerian oral history.

    3,500
  • 0 out of 5

    The Beggars’ Strike

    by Aminatta Sow Fall

     

     

    The sight of disease-ridden beggars in the streets is giving the town a bad name, and the tourists are starting to stay away. If the Director of Public Health and Hygiene can get rid of them he will have done a great service to the health and economy of the nation – not to mention his own promotion prospects. A plan of military precision is put into action to rid the streets of these verminous scroungers.

    But the beggars are organized too. They know that giving alms is a divine obligation and that Allah’s good will is vital to worldly promotion. So when the beggars withdraw their charitable service, the pious city civil servants and businessmen start to panic.

    1,000
  • 0 out of 5

    The Book of Memory

    by Petina Gappah

     

    Memory is an albino woman languishing in Chikurubi Maximum Security Prison in Harare, Zimbabwe, where she has been convicted of murder. As part of her appeal, her lawyer insists that she write down what happened as she remembers it. As her story unfolds, Memory reveals that she has been tried and convicted for the murder of Lloyd Hendricks, her adopted father. But who was Lloyd Hendricks? Why does Memory feel no remorse for his death? And did everything happen exactly as she remembers?

    3,500
  • 0 out of 5

    The Cardinals: With Meditations and Short Stories

    by Bessie Head

     

    It is the 1960s in South Africa.

    Blacks and whites are segregated, in life and love.

    1,000
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    The Carnivorous City

    by Toni Kan

     

    Sabato Rabato aka Soni Dike is a Lagos big boy; a criminal turned grandee, with a beautiful wife, a sea-side mansion and a questionable fortune. Then one day he disappears and his car is found in a ditch, music blaring from the speakers. Soni’s older brother, Abel Dike, a teacher, arrives in Lagos to look for his missing brother. Abel is rapidly sucked into the unforgiving Lagos maelstrom where he has to navigate encounters with a motley cast of common criminals, deal with policemen all intent on getting a piece of the pie, and contend with his growing attraction to his brother’s wife.

    The Carnivorous City is a story about love, family and just desserts but it is above all, a tale about Lagos and the people who make the city by the lagoon what it is.

    3,700
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    The Girl Who Can

    by Ama Ata Aidoo

     

    In this collection of short stories, Aidoo elevates the mundane in women’s lives to an intellectual level in an attempt at challenging patriarchal structures and dominance in African society.

    1,000
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    The Hairdresser of Harare

    by Tendai Huchu

     

    Vimbai is the best hairdresser in Mrs. Khumalo’s salon, and she is secure in her status until the handsome, smooth-talking Dumisani shows up one day for work. Despite her resistance, the two become friends, and eventually, Vimbai becomes Dumisani’s landlady. He is as charming as he is deft with the scissors, and Vimbai finds that he means more and more to her. Yet, by novel’s end, the pair’s deepening friendship—used or embraced by Dumisani and Vimbai with different futures in mind—collapses in unexpected brutality.

    The novel is an acute portrayal of a rapidly changing Zimbabwe. In addition to Vimbai and Dumisani’s personal development, the book shows us how social concerns shape the lives of everyday people.

    5,000
  • 0 out of 5

    The Maestro, the Magistrate and the Mathematician

    by Tendai Huchu

     

     

    Three very different men struggle with thoughts of belonging, loss, identity and love as they attempt to find a place for themselves in Britain. The Magistrate tries to create new memories and roots, fusing a wandering exploration of Edinburgh with music. The Maestro, a depressed, quixotic character, sinks out of the real world into the fantastic world of literature. The Mathematician, full of youth, follows a carefree, hedonistic lifestyle, until their three universes collide.

    2,000
  • 0 out of 5

    The Palm-Wine Drinkard

    by Amos Tutuola

     

    Drawing on the West African (Nigeria) Yoruba oral folktale tradition, Tutuola described the odyssey of a devoted palm-wine drinker through a nightmare of fantastic adventure.

    4,000
  • 0 out of 5

    The Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s Wives

    by  Lola Shoneyin

     

    African-born poet Lola Shoneyin makes her fiction debut with The Secret Lives of Babi Segi’s Wives, a perceptive, entertaining, and eye-opening novel of polygamy in modern-day Nigeria. The struggles, rivalries, intricate family politics, and the interplay of personalities and relationships within the complex private world of a polygamous union come to life in The Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s WivesBig Love and The 19th Wife set against a contemporary African background.

    2,500