Bookstore

  • 0 out of 5

    A Grain of Wheat

    by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o

     

    Set in the wake of the Mau Mau rebellion and on the cusp of Kenya’s independence from Britain, A Grain of Wheat follows a group of villagers whose lives have been transformed by the 1952–1960 Emergency. At the center of it all is the reticent Mugo, the village’s chosen hero and a man haunted by a terrible secret.

    As we learn of the villagers’ tangled histories in a narrative interwoven with myth and peppered with allusions to real-life leaders, including Jomo Kenyatta, a masterly story unfolds in which compromises are forced, friendships are betrayed, and loves are tested.

    2,150
  • 0 out of 5

    Butterfly Fish

    by Irenosen Okojie

     

    Butterfly Fish is a richly told story of a woman exploring her African heritage after her mother’s death. It is a haunting and compelling novel, with themes exploring love, hope, political upheaval, loss, and coming undone.

    2,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Everything Good Will Come

    by Sefi Atta

     

    It is 1971, a year after the Biafran War, and Nigeria is under military rule—though the politics of the state matter less than those of her home to Enitan Taiwo, an eleven-year-old girl tired of waiting for school to start. Will her mother, who has become deeply religious since the death of Taiwo’s brother, allow her friendship with the new girl next door, the brash and beautiful Sheri Bakare?

    Everything Good Will Come charts the fate of these two African girls, one born of privilege and the other, a lower class “half-caste”; one who is prepared to manipulate the traditional system while the other attempts to defy it.

    3,500
  • 0 out of 5

    Half of a Yellow Sun

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

     

    With effortless grace, celebrated author Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie illuminates a seminal moment in modern African history: Biafra’s impassioned struggle to establish an independent republic in southeastern Nigeria during the late 1960s.

    We experience this tumultuous decade alongside five unforgettable characters: Ugwu, a thirteen-year-old houseboy who works for Odenigbo, a university professor full of revolutionary zeal; Olanna, the professor’s beautiful young mistress who has abandoned her life in Lagos for a dusty town and her lover’s charm; and Richard, a shy young Englishman infatuated with Olanna’s willful twin sister Kainene.

    Half of a Yellow Sun is a tremendously evocative novel of the promise, hope, and disappointment of the Biafran war.

    2,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Maru

    by Bessie Head

     

    An orphaned Masarwa girl comes to Dilepe to teach, only to discover that in this remote Botswana village her people are treated as outcasts.

    In the love story and intrigue that follow, the author’s exploration of racism draws upon her own experiences of growing up in South Africa.

    1,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Soldiers of Fortune: A History of Nigeria (1983-1993)

    by Max Siollun

     

    “This book is the story of Nigeria’s political journey between January 1, 1984 and August 27, 1993. This is the story of how things fell apart.”

    The years between 1984 and 1993 were momentous for Nigeria. Military rule crafted the conditions and character of today’s society, forcing cataclysmic changes on the political, economic and religious landscape that nearly tore the country apart on several occasions. Soldiers of Fortune is a fast-paced, thrilling yet objective analysis of the major events of the Buhari and Babangida eras. It reveals the true story behind past controversies such as the annulment of the June 12 election, the execution of Mamman Vatsa, the foiled kidnapping of Umaru Dikko, the Orkar coups and the assassination of Dele Giwa.

    Historian and lawyer Max Siollun gives an intimate, fly-on-the-wall portrait of the major events and dramatis personae of the period. Soldiers of Fortune is a must-read for all Nigerians and Nigeria- watchers. Its dramatic narrative style will engage casual or academic readers alike.

    4,000
  • 0 out of 5

    There Was a Country: A Personal History of Biafra

    by Chinua Achebe

     

    The defining experience of Chinua Achebe’s life was the Nigerian civil war, also known as the Biafran War, of 1967–1970. The conflict was infamous for its savage impact on the Biafran people, Chinua Achebe’s people, many of whom were starved to death after the Nigerian government blockaded their borders.

    He took the Biafran side in the conflict and served his government as a roving cultural ambassador, from which vantage he absorbed the war’s full horror. Immediately after, Achebe took refuge in an academic post in the United States, and for more than forty years he has maintained a considered silence on the events of those terrible years, addressing them only obliquely through his poetry.

    Now, decades in the making, comes a towering reckoning with one of modern Africa’s most fateful events, from a writer whose words and courage have left an enduring stamp on world literature.

    2,000