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    A Memory This Size and Other Stories

    The Caine Prize for African Writing is Africa’s leading literary prize. It has helped launch the careers of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Segun Afolabi, Leila Aboulela, Brian Chikwava, Binyavanga Wainaina, and many others. The 2013 collection includes the five shortlisted stories and the stories written at the Caine Prize Writers’ Workshop.

    2,100
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    Africa 39

    Africa39 is a collaborative project initiated by the Hay Festival in partnership with Rainbow Book Club, celebrating Port Harcourt: UNESCO World Book Capital 2014 by identifying 39 of the most promising writers under the age of 40 with the potential and talent to define trends in the development of literature from Sub-Saharan Africa and the diaspora. Africa39 follows the success of two previous Hay Festival initiatives linked to World Book Capital cities, Bogotá39 (2007) and Beirut39 (2009).
    The judges for Africa39 were Margaret Busby, Osonye Tess Onwueme and Elechi Amadi, selecting from submissions researched by Binyavanga Wainaina. The writers’ names were announced at the London Book Fair on 8 April 2014. An anthology entitled Africa39: New Writing from Africa South of the Sahara, featuring work by the 39 writers was published by Bloomsbury in October 2014, edited by Ellah Allfrey and with a preface by Wole Soyinka.

    (From Wikipedia)

    5,000
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    African Violet and Other Stories

    The Caine Prize for African Writing is Africa’s leading literary prize. It has helped launch the careers of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Segun Afolabi, Leila Aboulela, Brian Chikwava, Binyavanga Wainaina, and many others. The 2013 collection includes the five shortlisted stories and the stories written at the Caine Prize Writers’ Workshop.

    3,000
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    Distant View Of A Minaret and Other Stories

    by Alifa Rifaat

     

    “More convincingly than any other woman writing in Arabic today, Alifa Rifaat lifts the veil on what it means to be a women living within a traditional Muslim society.” So states the translator’s foreword to this collection of the Egyptian author’s best short stories. Rifaat did not go to university, spoke only Arabic, and seldom traveled abroad. This virtual immunity from Western influence lends a special authenticity to her direct yet sincere accounts of death, sexual fulfillment, the lives of women in purdah, and the frustrations of everyday life in a male-dominated Islamic environment.

    Translated from Arabic by Denys Johnson-Davies, the collection admits the reader into a hidden private world, regulated by the call of the mosque, but often full of profound anguish and personal isolation.

    1,000
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    Happiness, Like Water

    by Chinelo Okparanta

     

    Here are Nigerian women at home and transplanted to the United States, building lives out of longing and hope, faith and doubt, the struggle to stay and the mandate to leave, the burden and strength of love. Here are characters faced with dangerous decisions, children slick with oil from the river, a woman in love with another despite the penalties. Here is a world marked by electricity outages, lush landscapes, folktales, buses that break down and never start up again. Here is a portrait of Nigerians that is surprising, shocking, heartrending, loving, and across social strata, dealing in every kind of change. Here are stories filled with language to make your eyes pause and your throat catch.

    Happiness, Like Water introduces a true talent, a young writer with a beautiful heart and a capacious imagination.

    5,000
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    Incidents at the Shrine: Short Stories

    by Ben Okri

     

    Incidents at the Shrine is the first collection of stories by the author of 1991 Booker Prize-winning novel, The Famished Road.

    Whether the subject is a child’s eye view of the Nigerian Civil War, Lagos and the spirit world or dispossession in a decaying British inner city, Okri’s lyrical, poetic and humorous prose recreates the known and the unknown world with startling power.

    4,250
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    Indigo

    by Molara Wood

     

    The arrival of a second wife causes a woman to reassess her marriage… Another faces up to tough choices in the wake of a military coup… A heroine from history lights the path for a modern girl on the road to Jenwi… A picture on a wall tells its own poignant story of sacrifice… A former cultist must confront an unspoken secret in his family…

    From Nigeria to the Diaspora, joy, sadness, anxieties and triumphs fill the canvas with lush, vivid colours. Themes of loss and longing, past and present, home and away, mysticism and modernity, trauma and healing, truth and lies, masculinity and a woman’s place – all are deftly explored in this mesmerising, sometimes devastating collection of short stories.

    2,750
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    Love Is Power, or Something Like That: Stories

    by Igoni Barrett

     

    When it comes to love, things are not always what they seem. In contemporary Lagos, a young boy may pose as a woman online, and a maid may be suspected of sleeping with her employer and yet still become a young wife’s confidante. Men and women can be objects of fantasy, the subject of beery soliloquies. They can be trophies or status symbols. Or they can be overwhelming in their need.
    In these wide-ranging stories, A. Igoni Barrett roams the streets with people from all stations of life. A man with acute halitosis navigates the chaos of the Lagos bus system. A minor policeman, full of the authority and corruption of his uniform, beats his wife. A family’s fortunes fall from love and wealth to infidelity and poverty as poor choices unfurl over three generations. With humor and tenderness, Barrett introduces us to an utterly modern Nigeria, where desire is a means to an end, and love is a power as real as money.

    2,500
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    News from Home

    by Sefi Atta

     

     

    From Zamfara up country, to the Niger Delta down south, with a finale in Africa’s most populous city, Lagos, this collection of stories and a novella are inspired by newspaper headlines and narrated by a range of Nigerian voices that are elevated to the realm of the sublime by Sefi Atta’s distinctive, clinical narrative skill.

    3,500
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    Nights of the Creaking Bed

    by Toni Kan

     

     

    Nights of the Creaking Bed is full of colourful characters involved in affecting dramas: a girl who is rejected in love because she has three brothers to look after; a middle aged housewife who finds love again but has an impossible decision to make; a young man who can’t get the image of his naked, beautiful mother out of his mind; a child so poor he has to hawk onions on Christmas day – and many others. Some, initially full of hope, find their lives blighted by the cruelty of others, or by being in the wrong place at the wrong time, or by just not knowing the “right” people.

    Corruption, religious intolerance, gratuitous violence, the irresponsible attitudes of some men to their offspring and the importance of joy are some of the big themes that underlie this memorable collection.

    2,000
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    Tales of Freedom

    by Ben Okri

     

    Tales of Freedom offers a haunting necklace of images which flash and sparkle as the light shines on them. Quick and stimulating to read, but slowly burning in the memory, they offer a different, more transcendent way of looking at our extreme, gritty world.

    4,250
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    The Cardinals: With Meditations and Short Stories

    by Bessie Head

     

    It is the 1960s in South Africa.

    Blacks and whites are segregated, in life and love.

    1,000
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    The Girl Who Can

    by Ama Ata Aidoo

     

    In this collection of short stories, Aidoo elevates the mundane in women’s lives to an intellectual level in an attempt at challenging patriarchal structures and dominance in African society.

    1,000
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    The Thing Around Your Neck

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

     

    In her most intimate and seamlessly crafted work to date, Adichie turns her penetrating eye on not only Nigeria but America, in twelve dazzling stories that explore the ties that bind men and women, parents and children, Africa and the United States.

    In “A Private Experience,” a medical student hides from a violent riot with a poor Muslim woman whose dignity and faith force her to confront the realities and fears she’s been pushing away. In “Tomorrow is Too Far,” a woman unlocks the devastating secret that surrounds her brother’s death. The young mother at the center of “Imitation” finds her comfortable life in Philadelphia threatened when she learns that her husband has moved his mistress into their Lagos home. And the title story depicts the choking loneliness of a Nigerian girl who moves to an America that turns out to be nothing like the country she expected; though falling in love brings her desires nearly within reach, a death in her homeland forces her to reexamine them.

    1,500
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    To See the Mountain and Other Stories

    The Caine Prize for African Writing is Africa’s leading literary prize. It has helped launch the careers of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Segun Afolabi, Leila Aboulela, Brian Chikwava, Binyavanga Wainaina, and many others. The 2013 collection includes the five shortlisted stories and the stories written at the Caine Prize Writers’ Workshop.

    3,000
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    Tropical Fish: Tales from Entebbe

    by Doreen Baingana

     

    Set mostly in pastoral Entebbe with stops in the cities Kampala and Los Angeles, the book follows a Ugandan girl as she navigates the uncertain terrain of adolescence. Tropical Fish depicts the reality of life for Christine Mugisha and her family after Idi Amin’s dictatorship. Three of the eight chapters are told from the point of view of Christine s two older sisters, Patti, a born-again Christian who finds herself starving at her boarding school, and Rosa, a free spirit who tries to magically seduce one of her teachers. But the star of Tropical Fish is Christine, whom we accompany from her first wobbly steps in high heels, to her encounters with the first-world conveniences and alienation of America, to her return home to Uganda.

    As the Mugishas cope with Uganda’s collapsing infrastructure, they also contend with the universal themes of family cohesion, sex and relationships, disease, betrayal, and spirituality. Anyone dipping into Baingana s incandescent, widely acclaimed novel will enjoy their immersion in the world of this talented newcomer.

    2,000
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    What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky

    by Lesley Nneka Arimah

     

    In Who Will Greet You at Home a woman desperate for a child weaves one out of hair, with unsettling results. In Wild, a disastrous night out shifts a teenager and her Nigerian cousin onto uneasy common ground. In The Future Looks Good, three generations of women are haunted by the ghosts of war, while in Light, a father struggles to protect and empower the daughter he loves. And in the title story, in a world ravaged by flood and riven by class, experts have discovered how to “fix the equation of a person” – with rippling, unforeseen repercussions.

    2,500