• secret lives and other stories by Ngugi wa Thiongo on thebookdealer
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    Secret Lives and Other Stories

    Ngugi wa Thiong’o is renowned for his political novels and plays, yet he honed his craft as a short story writer. First published in 1975, Secret Lives and Other Stories brings together a range of Ngugi’s political short stories. From tales of the meeting between magic and superstition, to stories about the modernising forces of colonialism, and the pervasive threat of nature, this collection celebrates the storytelling might of one of Africa’s best-loved writers.

    5,000
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    She Called Me Woman

    Edited by Azeenarh Mohammed, Chitra Nagarajan and Rafeeat Aliyu

    This stirring and intimate collection brings together 25 first hand accounts to paint a vivid portrait of what it means to be a queer Nigerian woman. These brave and beautifully-told stories of resistance and resilience reveal the realities of a community that will no longer be invisible. From the joy and excitement of first love, the agony of lost love and betrayal, memories of childhood games to addiction and suicide, She Called Me Woman shows us how Nigeria’s queer woman, in all their multitudes, attempt to build a life together.

    3,500
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    Silver Lining

    Silver Lining is the moving story of one young man’s desperate search for true love and bliss in the heart of one of the renowned ghettos of Lagos. His intimate friend Richard introduces him to Tina, a beautiful young damsel, who he finds himself falling head over heels in love with.
    Has this young man found his heart’s true love for keeps or is it just another desperate chase after the elusive will-o-the-wisp men call love?

    1,000
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    Soldiers of Fortune: A History of Nigeria (1983-1993)

    by Max Siollun

     

    “This book is the story of Nigeria’s political journey between January 1, 1984 and August 27, 1993. This is the story of how things fell apart.”

    The years between 1984 and 1993 were momentous for Nigeria. Military rule crafted the conditions and character of today’s society, forcing cataclysmic changes on the political, economic and religious landscape that nearly tore the country apart on several occasions. Soldiers of Fortune is a fast-paced, thrilling yet objective analysis of the major events of the Buhari and Babangida eras. It reveals the true story behind past controversies such as the annulment of the June 12 election, the execution of Mamman Vatsa, the foiled kidnapping of Umaru Dikko, the Orkar coups and the assassination of Dele Giwa.

    Historian and lawyer Max Siollun gives an intimate, fly-on-the-wall portrait of the major events and dramatis personae of the period. Soldiers of Fortune is a must-read for all Nigerians and Nigeria- watchers. Its dramatic narrative style will engage casual or academic readers alike.

    4,000
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    Starbook

    by Ben Okri

     

    Starbook tells the tale of a prince and a maiden in a mythical land where a golden age is ending. Their fragile story considers the important questions we all face, exploring creativity, wisdom, suffering and transcendence in a time when imagination still ruled the world.

    5,000
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    3.00 out of 5

    Stay With Me

    by Ayobami Adebayo

     

    Yejide and Akin have been married since they met and fell in love at university. Though many expected Akin to take several wives, he and Yejide have always agreed: polygamy is not for them. But four years into their marriage–after consulting fertility doctors and healers, trying strange teas and unlikely cures–Yejide is still not pregnant. She assumes she still has time–until her family arrives on her doorstep with a young woman they introduce as Akin’s second wife. Furious, shocked, and livid with jealousy, Yejide knows the only way to save her marriage is to get pregnant. Which, finally, she does–but at a cost far greater than she could have dared to imagine.

    An electrifying novel of enormous emotional power, Stay With Me asks how much we can sacrifice for the sake of family.

    3,500
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    Swallow

    by Sefi Atta

     

    It is the mid-1980s in Lagos and the government’s War Against Indiscipline and austerity measures are fully in operation. Tolani Ajao is a secretary working at Federal Community Bank. A succession of unfortunate events leads Tolani’s roommate and colleague, Rose, to consider drug trafficking as an alternative means of making a living. Tolani’s subsequent struggle with temptation forces her to reconsider her morality and that of her mother Arike’s, as she embarks on a turbulent journey of self-discovery.

    Their story, narrated by mother and daughter, is a tribute to Nigerian oral history.

    3,500
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    Taduno’s Song

    by Odafe Atogun

     

    The day a stained brown envelope arrives from Taduno’s homeland, he knows that the time has come to return from exile. Arriving full of trepidation, the musician discovers that his community no longer recognises him, believing that Taduno is dead. His girlfriend Lela has disappeared, taken away by government agents. As he wanders through his house in search of clues, he realises that any traces of his old life have been erased. All that was left of his life and himself are memories. But Taduno finds a new purpose: to unravel the mystery of his lost life and to find his lost love. Through this search, he comes to face a difficult decision: to sing for love or to sing for his people.

    Taduno’s Song is a moving tale of sacrifice, love and courage.

    3,500
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    Tales of Freedom

    by Ben Okri

     

    Tales of Freedom offers a haunting necklace of images which flash and sparkle as the light shines on them. Quick and stimulating to read, but slowly burning in the memory, they offer a different, more transcendent way of looking at our extreme, gritty world.

    4,250
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    The Beggars’ Strike

    by Aminatta Sow Fall

     

     

    The sight of disease-ridden beggars in the streets is giving the town a bad name, and the tourists are starting to stay away. If the Director of Public Health and Hygiene can get rid of them he will have done a great service to the health and economy of the nation – not to mention his own promotion prospects. A plan of military precision is put into action to rid the streets of these verminous scroungers.

    But the beggars are organized too. They know that giving alms is a divine obligation and that Allah’s good will is vital to worldly promotion. So when the beggars withdraw their charitable service, the pious city civil servants and businessmen start to panic.

    1,000
  • beginning of everything colourful book by onyeka nwelue on thebookdealerng
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    The Beginning Of Everything Colourful

    Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko are welcoming Spain’s King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia. Who are visiting Japan as state guests, at the Imperial Palace. With Crown Prince Naruhito and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe also attending a related event there. But there are two nameless people who are not happy with this visit. A Mexican musician, who hates the Spanish and a Japanese business man, who hates the Chinese.

    3,500
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    The Book of Memory

    by Petina Gappah

     

    Memory is an albino woman languishing in Chikurubi Maximum Security Prison in Harare, Zimbabwe, where she has been convicted of murder. As part of her appeal, her lawyer insists that she write down what happened as she remembers it. As her story unfolds, Memory reveals that she has been tried and convicted for the murder of Lloyd Hendricks, her adopted father. But who was Lloyd Hendricks? Why does Memory feel no remorse for his death? And did everything happen exactly as she remembers?

    3,500
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    The Book of Phoenix

    by Nnedi Okorafor

     

    Phoenix was grown and raised among other genetic experiments in New York’s Tower 7. She is an “accelerated woman”—only two years old but with the body and mind of an adult, Phoenix’s abilities far exceed those of a normal human. Still innocent and inexperienced in the ways of the world, she is content living in her room speed reading e-books, running on her treadmill, and basking in the love of Saeed, another biologically altered human of Tower 7.
    Then one evening, Saeed witnesses something so terrible that he takes his own life. Devastated by his death and Tower 7’s refusal to answer her questions, Phoenix finally begins to realize that her home is really her prison, and she becomes desperate to escape.
    But Phoenix’s escape, and her destruction of Tower 7, is just the beginning of her story. Before her story ends, Phoenix will travel from the United States to Africa and back, changing the entire course of humanity’s future.

    4,500
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    The Cardinals: With Meditations and Short Stories

    by Bessie Head

     

    It is the 1960s in South Africa.

    Blacks and whites are segregated, in life and love.

    1,000
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    The Carnivorous City

    by Toni Kan

     

    Sabato Rabato aka Soni Dike is a Lagos big boy; a criminal turned grandee, with a beautiful wife, a sea-side mansion and a questionable fortune. Then one day he disappears and his car is found in a ditch, music blaring from the speakers. Soni’s older brother, Abel Dike, a teacher, arrives in Lagos to look for his missing brother. Abel is rapidly sucked into the unforgiving Lagos maelstrom where he has to navigate encounters with a motley cast of common criminals, deal with policemen all intent on getting a piece of the pie, and contend with his growing attraction to his brother’s wife.

    The Carnivorous City is a story about love, family and just desserts but it is above all, a tale about Lagos and the people who make the city by the lagoon what it is.

    3,700
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    The Chibok Girls: The Boko Haram Kidnappings and Islamist Militancy in Nigeria

    by Helon Habila

     

     

    On April 14, 2014, 276 girls from the Chibok Secondary School in northern Nigeria were kidnapped by Boko Haram, the world’s deadliest terrorist group. Most were never heard from again. Acclaimed Nigerian novelist Helon Habila, who grew up in northern Nigeria, returned to Chibok and gained intimate access to the families of the kidnapped to offer a devastating account of this tragedy that stunned the world.

    With compassion and deep understanding of historical context, Habila tells the stories of the girls and the anguish of their parents; chronicles the rise of Boko Haram and the Nigerian government’s inept response; and captures the indifference of the media and the international community whose attention has moved on.

    2,500
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    The Concubine

    by Elechi Amadi

     

    Ihuoma, a beautiful young widow, has the admiration of the entire community in which she lives, and especially of the hunter Ekwueme. But their passion is fated and jealousy, a love potion and the closeness of the spirit world are important factors.

    1,000
  • the famished road book by ben okri on the book dealer
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    The famished road

    The narrator, Azaro, is an abiku, a spirit child, who in the Yoruba tradition of Nigeria exists between life and death. He is born into a world of poverty, ignorance and injustice, but Azaro awakens with a smile on his face.

    4,500
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    The Farm

    by Adesuwa Ehinome Iluobe

     

    The Farm is a collection of stories which are reflections on Nigeria and her experiences. The Farm is the lead story, set in a rustic part of Nigeria, an unusual farm records uncommon success and productivity in its operations.

    Separated from her loved ones, Moremi is flung into an unfamiliar world that is highly expectant of her. Amidst fatal changes, bizarre alliances, quest for wealth and love, she finds an unlikely friend in Ugonna. Together they must do their part to ensure continued success of the Farm. With each choice they make, their lives unfolds before them until they stumble upon a shattering revelation that unsettles what little balance there is at the farm.

    In Elusion, Ese and Ibrahim take us on a thrilling journey that highlights the bond between the duo, which introduced them to each other’s peculiarities and uniqueness both in their cultural and religious differences. Their bond further grows into a formidable love tangle that thrives despite the awakening of terrorism in the country.

    Human showcases the struggle of a Mother confronted with protecting her son from the reality of stigmatization and keeping him from battering other children who tease him with as Afin; a term he demands his mother to explain.

    Asabe and Hassanah share a close knit friendship in Residue  that is almost torn apart by insatiable needs and an ailing country.

    The last story One Year is a story of a young girl whose missing friend has caused her family despair and misery.  It was first published by Brittle Paper, a leading African Literary e-mag.

    1,750
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    The Fishermen

    by Chigozie Obioma

     

    In a Nigerian town in the mid 1990’s, four brothers encounter a madman whose mystic prophecy of violence threatens the core of their close-knit family.

    Told from the point of view of nine year old Benjamin, the youngest of four brothers, The Fishermen is the story of an unforgettable childhood in 1990s Nigeria, in the small town of Akure. When their strict father has to travel to a distant city for work, the brothers take advantage of his extended absence to skip school and go fishing. At the ominous, forbidden nearby river, they meet a dangerous local madman who persuades the oldest of the boys that he is destined to be killed by one of his siblings. What happens next is an almost mythic event whose impact-both tragic and redemptive-will transcend the lives and imaginations of its characters and its readers.

    3,000
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    The Girl Who Can

    by Ama Ata Aidoo

     

    In this collection of short stories, Aidoo elevates the mundane in women’s lives to an intellectual level in an attempt at challenging patriarchal structures and dominance in African society.

    1,000
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    The Hairdresser of Harare

    by Tendai Huchu

     

    Vimbai is the best hairdresser in Mrs. Khumalo’s salon, and she is secure in her status until the handsome, smooth-talking Dumisani shows up one day for work. Despite her resistance, the two become friends, and eventually, Vimbai becomes Dumisani’s landlady. He is as charming as he is deft with the scissors, and Vimbai finds that he means more and more to her. Yet, by novel’s end, the pair’s deepening friendship—used or embraced by Dumisani and Vimbai with different futures in mind—collapses in unexpected brutality.

    The novel is an acute portrayal of a rapidly changing Zimbabwe. In addition to Vimbai and Dumisani’s personal development, the book shows us how social concerns shape the lives of everyday people.

    5,000
  • The house my father built written by adewale maja-pearce author bookdealerng nigerias best online bookstore
    0 out of 5

    The House My Father Built

    In this memoir, about a house his father built, Adewale Maja-Pearce captures the essence of the last decade of the 20th Century. He paints, in the minutest of detail, the sense of transition, of inevitable change, of frustration at its slow pace. The reader, while focused on the small details, is coerced to lean back, and take in the big picture.

    2,500