• 0 out of 5

    The Palm-Wine Drinkard

    by Amos Tutuola

     

    Drawing on the West African (Nigeria) Yoruba oral folktale tradition, Tutuola described the odyssey of a devoted palm-wine drinker through a nightmare of fantastic adventure.

    4,000
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    The Pressure Cooker

    “Don’t you know you are a girl?”
    Nkiru Olumide-Ojo sets out, in this book, to respond to that question, and in the process, subvert its hidden “restraining” intent.
    In nine short and eminently readable chapters, The Pressure Cooker offers advice to women in the workplace. Advice that comes from Ms Olumide-Ojo’s lived experience—of motherhood, workplace politics, and climbing up that corporate ladder.
    3,500
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    The Principles for Priceless Purpose Manifestation

    By Apostle Franklyn Osaro Osakue

    Every man has great gifts and potentails in him that need to be discovered. When it is discovered and engaged with all diligence, with full determination and a mindset to please God with the gift, it will definitely result in success and fulfillment.

    Consequently, a man of purpose must be regulated by revealed divine principles for fulfilment to be realized. the principles in this book are divinely coated to drive purpose to achievement. This book is written to empower men and women with purpose to achieve same as the redemptive design for humanity has settled this issue.

    This book is a must read, if you want to be fulfilled according to the will of God designed for your life. The book will help you to recharge your spiritual strength bank and put you in charge of life affairs. Ultimately, it will influence you in the direction of God’s will for you.

    1,500
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    0 out of 5

    The Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s Wives

    by  Lola Shoneyin

     

    African-born poet Lola Shoneyin makes her fiction debut with The Secret Lives of Babi Segi’s Wives, a perceptive, entertaining, and eye-opening novel of polygamy in modern-day Nigeria. The struggles, rivalries, intricate family politics, and the interplay of personalities and relationships within the complex private world of a polygamous union come to life in The Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s WivesBig Love and The 19th Wife set against a contemporary African background.

    2,500
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    The Story of a Shipwrecked Sailor

    by Gabriel García Márquez

     

    This is Marquez’s account of a real-life event. In 1955, eight crew members of the destroyer Caldas, were swept into the Caribbean Sea. The sole survivor, Luis Alejandro Belasco, told the true version of the events to Marquez, causing great scandal at the time.

    4,000
  • 0 out of 5

    The Stress Test

    Taramade Johnson seems to have it all. but she is stuck in a dead-end marriage, consumed by her desire for Adam Okoye, a male colleague, and burdened with a secret that could cause her to lose everything.

    Things start to come undone when it is revealed that the Johnsons’ Marine Compact Bank, led by the tyrannical Damelda Johnson, Taramade’s mother-in-law, is not as healthy as it would appear. a bureaucratic reformer, Banke Olumide, soon emerges and takes Damelda’s place as MD of the troubled bank.

    Meanwhile, Damelda retires to hatch a plan that will put control of the bank in her grip again. But there are others who want the bank just as much as Damelda does. And for some, it is a battle worth dying or killing for.

    2,000
  • Hot
    0 out of 5

    The Thing Around Your Neck

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

     

    In her most intimate and seamlessly crafted work to date, Adichie turns her penetrating eye on not only Nigeria but America, in twelve dazzling stories that explore the ties that bind men and women, parents and children, Africa and the United States.

    In “A Private Experience,” a medical student hides from a violent riot with a poor Muslim woman whose dignity and faith force her to confront the realities and fears she’s been pushing away. In “Tomorrow is Too Far,” a woman unlocks the devastating secret that surrounds her brother’s death. The young mother at the center of “Imitation” finds her comfortable life in Philadelphia threatened when she learns that her husband has moved his mistress into their Lagos home. And the title story depicts the choking loneliness of a Nigerian girl who moves to an America that turns out to be nothing like the country she expected; though falling in love brings her desires nearly within reach, a death in her homeland forces her to reexamine them.

    1,500
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    The Victims

    by Isidore Okpewho

     

    Okpewho’s novel focuses on the life of a Nigerian villager who is tormented by two wives.

    1,000
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    The Woman Next Door

    by Yewande Omotoso

     

    Hortensia James and Marion Agostino are neighbours. One is black, one white. Both are successful women with impressive careers. Both have recently been widowed. And both are sworn enemies, sharing hedge and hostility which they prune with a zeal that belies the fact that they are both over eighty.

    But one day an unforeseen event forces the women together. And gradually the bickering and sniping softens into lively debate, and from there into memories shared. But could these sparks of connection ever transform into friendship? Or is it too late to expect these two to change?

    2,000
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    There Was a Country: A Personal History of Biafra

    by Chinua Achebe

     

    The defining experience of Chinua Achebe’s life was the Nigerian civil war, also known as the Biafran War, of 1967–1970. The conflict was infamous for its savage impact on the Biafran people, Chinua Achebe’s people, many of whom were starved to death after the Nigerian government blockaded their borders.

    He took the Biafran side in the conflict and served his government as a roving cultural ambassador, from which vantage he absorbed the war’s full horror. Immediately after, Achebe took refuge in an academic post in the United States, and for more than forty years he has maintained a considered silence on the events of those terrible years, addressing them only obliquely through his poetry.

    Now, decades in the making, comes a towering reckoning with one of modern Africa’s most fateful events, from a writer whose words and courage have left an enduring stamp on world literature.

    2,000
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    Things Fall Apart (The African Trilogy, #1)

    by Chinua Achebe

     

    Things Fall Apart tells two overlapping, intertwining stories, both of which center around Okonkwo, a “strong man” of an Ibo village in Nigeria. The first of these stories traces Okonkwo’s fall from grace with the tribal world in which he lives, and in its classical purity of line and economical beauty it provides us with a powerful fable about the immemorial conflict between the individual and society.

    The second story, which is as modern as the first is ancient, and which elevates the book to a tragic plane, concerns the clash of cultures and the destruction of Okonkwo’s world through the arrival of aggressive, proselytizing European missionaries. These twin dramas are perfectly harmonized, and they are modulated by an awareness capable of encompassing at once the life of nature, human history, and the mysterious compulsions of the soul.

    1,000
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    Tides

    by Isidore Okpewho

     

    Set in Nigeria in 1975. When their Delta homeland is threatened, two journalists join forces in a project which brings them into tragic contact with security forces and dissidents alike.

    1,000
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    Tiny Sunbirds, Far Away

    by Christie Watson

     

    When their mother catches their father with another woman, twelve year-old Blessing and her fourteen-year-old brother, Ezekiel, are forced to leave their comfortable home in Lagos for a village in the Niger Delta, to live with their mother’s family. Without running water or electricity, Warri is at first a nightmare for Blessing. Her mother is gone all day and works suspiciously late into the night to pay the children’s school fees. Her brother, once a promising student, seems to be falling increasingly under the influence of the local group of violent teenage boys calling themselves Freedom Fighters. Blessing is exposed to the horrors of genital mutilation and the devastation wrought on the environment by British and American oil companies. Her grandfather, a kind if misguided man, is trying on Islam as his new religion of choice, and is even considering the possibility of bringing in a second wife.

    Tiny Sunbirds, Far Away is the witty and beautifully written story of one family’s attempt to survive a new life they could never have imagined, struggling to find a deeper sense of identity along the way.

    2,200
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    To See the Mountain and Other Stories

    The Caine Prize for African Writing is Africa’s leading literary prize. It has helped launch the careers of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Segun Afolabi, Leila Aboulela, Brian Chikwava, Binyavanga Wainaina, and many others. The 2013 collection includes the five shortlisted stories and the stories written at the Caine Prize Writers’ Workshop.

    3,000
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    Tomorrow Died Yesterday

    Its 2004 Port Harcourt, Nigeria at the height of the kidnap of oil workers in the Niger delta, a kidnapping goes awry and four lives are reconnected. Douye aka Doughboy the career militant responsible for the crime. Amaibi the gentle university professor / eco-warrior accused. Kaniye the lawyer turned restaurateur who tries to get him off and Tubo an amoral oil company executive. Against a backdrop of corrupt practises, failed systems and injustice, these four friends tell the story of oil in a region and its effects on local communities and the Nigerian larger society.

    2,000
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    Tropical Fish: Tales from Entebbe

    by Doreen Baingana

     

    Set mostly in pastoral Entebbe with stops in the cities Kampala and Los Angeles, the book follows a Ugandan girl as she navigates the uncertain terrain of adolescence. Tropical Fish depicts the reality of life for Christine Mugisha and her family after Idi Amin’s dictatorship. Three of the eight chapters are told from the point of view of Christine s two older sisters, Patti, a born-again Christian who finds herself starving at her boarding school, and Rosa, a free spirit who tries to magically seduce one of her teachers. But the star of Tropical Fish is Christine, whom we accompany from her first wobbly steps in high heels, to her encounters with the first-world conveniences and alienation of America, to her return home to Uganda.

    As the Mugishas cope with Uganda’s collapsing infrastructure, they also contend with the universal themes of family cohesion, sex and relationships, disease, betrayal, and spirituality. Anyone dipping into Baingana s incandescent, widely acclaimed novel will enjoy their immersion in the world of this talented newcomer.

    2,000
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    Under the Udala Trees

    by Chinelo Okparanta

     

    Inspired by Nigeria’s folktales and its war, Under the Udala Trees is a deeply searching, powerful debut about the dangers of living and loving openly.

    Ijeoma comes of age as her nation does; born before independence, she is eleven when civil war breaks out in the young republic of Nigeria. Sent away to safety, she meets another displaced child and they, star-crossed, fall in love. They are from different ethnic communities. They are also both girls. When their love is discovered, Ijeoma learns that she will have to hide this part of herself. But there is a cost to living inside a lie.

    2,500
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    Violence

    by Festus Iyayi

     

    Violence portrays a modern African society in a money economy wherein the possession of the capital is paramount in defining the individual as a member of the community. The characters in Violence come into two distinct categories — those who own the capital and those who don’t.
    Festus Iyayi’s novel reflects the modern African society in its diverse forms: the urban society, morality, the problematic of development of newly independent African nations, and the attraction of towns and cities on country folks.

    1,000
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    We Need New Names

    by NoViolet Bulawayo

     

    Darling is only ten years old, and yet she must navigate a fragile and violent world. In Zimbabwe, Darling and her friends steal guavas, try to get the baby out of young Chipo’s belly, and grasp at memories of Before. Before their homes were destroyed by paramilitary policemen, before the school closed, before the fathers left for dangerous jobs abroad. But Darling has a chance to escape: she has an aunt in America. She travels to this new land in search of America’s famous abundance only to find that her options as an immigrant are perilously few.

    NoViolet Bulawayo’s debut calls to mind the great storytellers of displacement and arrival who have come before her-from Junot Diaz to Zadie Smith to J.M. Coetzee-while she tells a vivid, raw story all her own.

    6,000
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    We Should All Be Feminists

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

     

    The highly acclaimed, provocative New York Times bestseller—a personal, eloquently-argued essay, adapted from the much-admired TEDx talk of the same name—from Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, award-winning author of Americanah. Here she offers readers a unique definition of feminism for the twenty-first century, one rooted in inclusion and awareness. Drawing extensively on her own experiences and her deep understanding of the often masked realities of sexual politics, here is one remarkable author’s exploration of what it means to be a woman now—and an of-the-moment rallying cry for why we should all be feminists.

    1,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Weep Not, Child

    by Ngũgĩ wa Thiong’o

     

    Tells the moving story about the effects of the Mau Mau war on the lives of ordinary men and women in Kenya. In the forests, the Mau Mau are waging war against the white government, and two brothers, Kamau and Njoroge, and the rest of the family must decide where their loyalties lie.

    2,150
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    What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky

    by Lesley Nneka Arimah

     

    In Who Will Greet You at Home a woman desperate for a child weaves one out of hair, with unsettling results. In Wild, a disastrous night out shifts a teenager and her Nigerian cousin onto uneasy common ground. In The Future Looks Good, three generations of women are haunted by the ghosts of war, while in Light, a father struggles to protect and empower the daughter he loves. And in the title story, in a world ravaged by flood and riven by class, experts have discovered how to “fix the equation of a person” – with rippling, unforeseen repercussions.

    2,500
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    What It Takes

    by Lola Akande

     

    What It Takes is a sad, vivid expose, of a typical Nigerian University doctorate programme that gleefully cannibalises the best of its own. It is a story of discouragement of excellent academic pursuits, depicting the prevalence of favouritism, ethnicity, nepotism, corruption, lust, needy culture and other negative tendencies currently ravaging the knowledge industry in Nigeria.

    The Heroine, Funto Oyewole, a middle-aged and ambitious woman, tells her own story about her dreams, hopes, aspirations, enthusiasms, disappointments and misery as a doctorate student, and how her zeal, high energy and enthusiasm are gradually replaced by frustration and despondency, which hasten her aging process, as her hope of earning a PhD through hard work becomes increasingly elusive.

    4,000
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    5.00 out of 5

    What Sunny Saw in the Flames

    by Nnedi Okorafor

     

    What Sunny Saw in the Flames transports the reader to a magical place where nothing is quite as it seems. Born in New York, but living in Aba, Nigeria, thirteen-year-old Sunny is understandably a little lost. She is albino. Her eyes are so sensitive to the sun that she has to wait until evening to play football. Apart from being good at the beautiful game, she has a special gift: she can see into the future. At school, she soon becomes part of a special quartet with unique powers. Together, Sunny, Orlu, Chichi and Sasha explore this exciting realm of strange creatures and dark secrets. The good news is that in this world, your worst defect is actually your greatest asset. But there’s a catch. Someone is kidnapping children and maiming or killing them. The group is asked to help track down the criminal. Will Sunny be able to overcome the killer with powers stronger than her own, or will the future she saw in the flames come to reality?

    2,000