• 0 out of 5

    The Hundred Wells of Salaga

    by Ayesha Harruna Attah

    Aminah lives an idyllic life in the village of Botu, until she is brutally seperated from her home and forced on a journey that will turn her from a daydreamer into a resilient woman. Wurche, the wilful daughter of a chief, is desperate to play an important role in her father’s court of Salaga-Kpembe.

    The lives of these two remarkable woman converage in a tumultuous meeting that takes them from mistress and salve to unlikely allies, as Aminah and Wurche find themselves tangled in a web of desire, jealously, political intrigue and illcit affairs. Meanwhile, infighting among Wurche’s people threatens to leave the region exposed to powers much larger than themselves.

    The Hundred Wells of Salaga explores the depths of female friendships in this stirringly intimate reimagining of life in pre-colonial Ghana. This captivating novel establishes Ayesha Harruna Attah as one of the most distinctive voices of the contemporary literary scene.

    3,000
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    The Joys Of Motherhood

    by Buchi Emecheta

     

    Nnu Ego is a woman who gives all her energy, money and everything she has to raising her children – leaving her little time to make friends.

    1,500
  • 0 out of 5

    The Landscapes Within

    by Ben Okri

     

    In 1981, Nigerian author Ben Okri published The Landscapes Within, a novel about a young painter’s life and creative aspirations. This work, in Okri’s own words, “…continued to haunt [him] and trouble [him] through the years, because in its spirit and essence [he] sensed that it was incomplete.”

    Therefore, he published a revised version of this early book, under the title Dangerous Love, in 1996.

    1,500
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    The Last Duty

    by Isidore Okpewho

     

    Set during the Nigerian civil war, the story revolves around six main characters namely Toje, Ali, Oshevire, Aku, Odibo, and Oghenovo.

    1,000
  • 0 out of 5

    The Lazarus Effect

    by H.J. Golakai

     

    Vee Johnson is an investigative journalist for the Cape Town magazine Urban. When she spots a photo of a familiar-looking girl at a local hospital, Vee launches an investigation, under the pretext of writing an article about missing children. Alongside her oddball assistant Chloe Bishop, Vee delves into the secrets of the fractured Fourie and Paulsen families. What happened to Jacqui Paulsen, who left home two years ago and hasn’t been seen since?

    3,500
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    The Maestro, the Magistrate and the Mathematician

    by Tendai Huchu

     

     

    Three very different men struggle with thoughts of belonging, loss, identity and love as they attempt to find a place for themselves in Britain. The Magistrate tries to create new memories and roots, fusing a wandering exploration of Edinburgh with music. The Maestro, a depressed, quixotic character, sinks out of the real world into the fantastic world of literature. The Mathematician, full of youth, follows a carefree, hedonistic lifestyle, until their three universes collide.

    2,000
  • 0 out of 5

    The Palm-Wine Drinkard

    by Amos Tutuola

     

    Drawing on the West African (Nigeria) Yoruba oral folktale tradition, Tutuola described the odyssey of a devoted palm-wine drinker through a nightmare of fantastic adventure.

    4,000
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    The Pressure Cooker

    “Don’t you know you are a girl?”
    Nkiru Olumide-Ojo sets out, in this book, to respond to that question, and in the process, subvert its hidden “restraining” intent.
    In nine short and eminently readable chapters, The Pressure Cooker offers advice to women in the workplace. Advice that comes from Ms Olumide-Ojo’s lived experience—of motherhood, workplace politics, and climbing up that corporate ladder.
    3,500
  • 0 out of 5

    The Principles for Priceless Purpose Manifestation

    By Apostle Franklyn Osaro Osakue

    Every man has great gifts and potentails in him that need to be discovered. When it is discovered and engaged with all diligence, with full determination and a mindset to please God with the gift, it will definitely result in success and fulfillment.

    Consequently, a man of purpose must be regulated by revealed divine principles for fulfilment to be realized. the principles in this book are divinely coated to drive purpose to achievement. This book is written to empower men and women with purpose to achieve same as the redemptive design for humanity has settled this issue.

    This book is a must read, if you want to be fulfilled according to the will of God designed for your life. The book will help you to recharge your spiritual strength bank and put you in charge of life affairs. Ultimately, it will influence you in the direction of God’s will for you.

    1,500
  • 0 out of 5

    The Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s Wives

    by  Lola Shoneyin

     

    African-born poet Lola Shoneyin makes her fiction debut with The Secret Lives of Babi Segi’s Wives, a perceptive, entertaining, and eye-opening novel of polygamy in modern-day Nigeria. The struggles, rivalries, intricate family politics, and the interplay of personalities and relationships within the complex private world of a polygamous union come to life in The Secret Lives of Baba Segi’s WivesBig Love and The 19th Wife set against a contemporary African background.

    2,500
  • 0 out of 5

    The Story of a Shipwrecked Sailor

    by Gabriel García Márquez

     

    This is Marquez’s account of a real-life event. In 1955, eight crew members of the destroyer Caldas, were swept into the Caribbean Sea. The sole survivor, Luis Alejandro Belasco, told the true version of the events to Marquez, causing great scandal at the time.

    4,000
  • the stress test book by author Mojisola Aboyade-Cole on the book dealer
    0 out of 5

    The Stress Test

    Taramade Johnson seems to have it all. but she is stuck in a dead-end marriage, consumed by her desire for Adam Okoye, a male colleague, and burdened with a secret that could cause her to lose everything.

    1,500
  • Hot
    0 out of 5

    The Thing Around Your Neck

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

     

    In her most intimate and seamlessly crafted work to date, Adichie turns her penetrating eye on not only Nigeria but America, in twelve dazzling stories that explore the ties that bind men and women, parents and children, Africa and the United States.

    In “A Private Experience,” a medical student hides from a violent riot with a poor Muslim woman whose dignity and faith force her to confront the realities and fears she’s been pushing away. In “Tomorrow is Too Far,” a woman unlocks the devastating secret that surrounds her brother’s death. The young mother at the center of “Imitation” finds her comfortable life in Philadelphia threatened when she learns that her husband has moved his mistress into their Lagos home. And the title story depicts the choking loneliness of a Nigerian girl who moves to an America that turns out to be nothing like the country she expected; though falling in love brings her desires nearly within reach, a death in her homeland forces her to reexamine them.

    1,500
  • 0 out of 5

    The Victims

    by Isidore Okpewho

     

    Okpewho’s novel focuses on the life of a Nigerian villager who is tormented by two wives.

    1,000
  • 0 out of 5

    The Woman Next Door

    by Yewande Omotoso

     

    Hortensia James and Marion Agostino are neighbours. One is black, one white. Both are successful women with impressive careers. Both have recently been widowed. And both are sworn enemies, sharing hedge and hostility which they prune with a zeal that belies the fact that they are both over eighty.

    But one day an unforeseen event forces the women together. And gradually the bickering and sniping softens into lively debate, and from there into memories shared. But could these sparks of connection ever transform into friendship? Or is it too late to expect these two to change?

    2,000
  • There is an elephant in my wardrobe by yejide kilanko
    0 out of 5

    There Is An Elephant In My Wardrobe By Yejide Kilanko

    Have you ever wished for someone who will listen to your worries? Adùn does. When an elephant arrives at her home, Adùn is happy to have a new friend with big ears. Adùn’s happy feelings go away when Erù the elephant begins to eat her clothes. Friends should be kind to one another. How will Adùn make the elephant leave her wardrobe when it is stronger than her?

    1,000
  • 0 out of 5

    There Was a Country: A Personal History of Biafra

    by Chinua Achebe

     

    The defining experience of Chinua Achebe’s life was the Nigerian civil war, also known as the Biafran War, of 1967–1970. The conflict was infamous for its savage impact on the Biafran people, Chinua Achebe’s people, many of whom were starved to death after the Nigerian government blockaded their borders.

    He took the Biafran side in the conflict and served his government as a roving cultural ambassador, from which vantage he absorbed the war’s full horror. Immediately after, Achebe took refuge in an academic post in the United States, and for more than forty years he has maintained a considered silence on the events of those terrible years, addressing them only obliquely through his poetry.

    Now, decades in the making, comes a towering reckoning with one of modern Africa’s most fateful events, from a writer whose words and courage have left an enduring stamp on world literature.

    2,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Things Fall Apart (The African Trilogy, #1)

    by Chinua Achebe

     

    Things Fall Apart tells two overlapping, intertwining stories, both of which center around Okonkwo, a “strong man” of an Ibo village in Nigeria. The first of these stories traces Okonkwo’s fall from grace with the tribal world in which he lives, and in its classical purity of line and economical beauty it provides us with a powerful fable about the immemorial conflict between the individual and society.

    The second story, which is as modern as the first is ancient, and which elevates the book to a tragic plane, concerns the clash of cultures and the destruction of Okonkwo’s world through the arrival of aggressive, proselytizing European missionaries. These twin dramas are perfectly harmonized, and they are modulated by an awareness capable of encompassing at once the life of nature, human history, and the mysterious compulsions of the soul.

    1,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Tides

    by Isidore Okpewho

     

    Set in Nigeria in 1975. When their Delta homeland is threatened, two journalists join forces in a project which brings them into tragic contact with security forces and dissidents alike.

    1,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Tiny Sunbirds, Far Away

    by Christie Watson

     

    When their mother catches their father with another woman, twelve year-old Blessing and her fourteen-year-old brother, Ezekiel, are forced to leave their comfortable home in Lagos for a village in the Niger Delta, to live with their mother’s family. Without running water or electricity, Warri is at first a nightmare for Blessing. Her mother is gone all day and works suspiciously late into the night to pay the children’s school fees. Her brother, once a promising student, seems to be falling increasingly under the influence of the local group of violent teenage boys calling themselves Freedom Fighters. Blessing is exposed to the horrors of genital mutilation and the devastation wrought on the environment by British and American oil companies. Her grandfather, a kind if misguided man, is trying on Islam as his new religion of choice, and is even considering the possibility of bringing in a second wife.

    Tiny Sunbirds, Far Away is the witty and beautifully written story of one family’s attempt to survive a new life they could never have imagined, struggling to find a deeper sense of identity along the way.

    2,200
  • 0 out of 5

    To See the Mountain and Other Stories

    The Caine Prize for African Writing is Africa’s leading literary prize. It has helped launch the careers of Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie, Segun Afolabi, Leila Aboulela, Brian Chikwava, Binyavanga Wainaina, and many others. The 2013 collection includes the five shortlisted stories and the stories written at the Caine Prize Writers’ Workshop.

    3,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Tomorrow Died Yesterday

    Its 2004 Port Harcourt, Nigeria at the height of the kidnap of oil workers in the Niger delta, a kidnapping goes awry and four lives are reconnected. Douye aka Doughboy the career militant responsible for the crime. Amaibi the gentle university professor / eco-warrior accused. Kaniye the lawyer turned restaurateur who tries to get him off and Tubo an amoral oil company executive. Against a backdrop of corrupt practises, failed systems and injustice, these four friends tell the story of oil in a region and its effects on local communities and the Nigerian larger society.

    2,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Tropical Fish: Tales from Entebbe

    by Doreen Baingana

     

    Set mostly in pastoral Entebbe with stops in the cities Kampala and Los Angeles, the book follows a Ugandan girl as she navigates the uncertain terrain of adolescence. Tropical Fish depicts the reality of life for Christine Mugisha and her family after Idi Amin’s dictatorship. Three of the eight chapters are told from the point of view of Christine s two older sisters, Patti, a born-again Christian who finds herself starving at her boarding school, and Rosa, a free spirit who tries to magically seduce one of her teachers. But the star of Tropical Fish is Christine, whom we accompany from her first wobbly steps in high heels, to her encounters with the first-world conveniences and alienation of America, to her return home to Uganda.

    As the Mugishas cope with Uganda’s collapsing infrastructure, they also contend with the universal themes of family cohesion, sex and relationships, disease, betrayal, and spirituality. Anyone dipping into Baingana s incandescent, widely acclaimed novel will enjoy their immersion in the world of this talented newcomer.

    2,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Under the Udala Trees

    by Chinelo Okparanta

     

    Inspired by Nigeria’s folktales and its war, Under the Udala Trees is a deeply searching, powerful debut about the dangers of living and loving openly.

    Ijeoma comes of age as her nation does; born before independence, she is eleven when civil war breaks out in the young republic of Nigeria. Sent away to safety, she meets another displaced child and they, star-crossed, fall in love. They are from different ethnic communities. They are also both girls. When their love is discovered, Ijeoma learns that she will have to hide this part of herself. But there is a cost to living inside a lie.

    2,500