• Olasupo Shashore
    0 out of 5

    A Platter of Gold

    Over the course of fifty-four years till the eve of independence, eight colonial pro-consuls governors for the British Empire pitched wit, passion and guile against under-celebrated, sometimes everyday Nigerians – Ahmadu Attahiru I, the Sokoto Caliph and his cavalry, who violently resisted British ouster and occupation; Eleko and the Lagos Chieftains, who first claimed they would “rather die than pay tax”… This is a story of Nigeria’s history as well as the history of Nigeria’s story. The other story!

    10,000
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    A Woman Alone: Autobiographical Writings

    by Bessie Head

     

    Journalistic sketches, essays and personal notes form a biographical study of South African born Bessie Head’s complex existence.

    1,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Abduction Chronicles

    by Folarin Omotade Banigbe

    Kidnapping in the Niger Delta has been an ongoing phenomenon since around 2008. Starting from the kidnapping of expatriate oil workers by the militants, the scourge of kidnapping had progressively unravelled till it has now become so common place that anyone potentially is a target for the assortment of kidnapping groups that have since plagued the region.

     

    The author was kidnapped on the 1st of May 2016 from his home in Port Harcourt in very interesting circumstances. Gunmen stormed his home in the Rumuomasi area of Port Harcourt in the middle of the night, shot their way in to the house and after robbing them clean of valuables, proceeded to make away with the head of the house.

     

    This began a journey into the hinterlands of the Niger Delta creeks as he was held for ransom for 4 days and 4 nights in the most excruciating conditions.

    3,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Aké: The Years of Childhood

    by Wole Soyinka

     

    Aké: The Years of Childhood gives us the story of Soyinka’s boyhood before and during World War II in a Yoruba village in western Nigeria called Aké. A relentlessly curious child who loved books and getting into trouble, Soyinka grew up on a parsonage compound, raised by Christian parents and by a grandfather who introduced him to Yoruba spiritual traditions. His vivid evocation of the colorful sights, sounds, and aromas of the world that shaped him is both lyrically beautiful and laced with humor and the sheer delight of a child’s-eye view.

    A classic of African autobiography, Aké is also a transcendantly timeless portrait of the mysteries of childhood.

    4,000
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    Are You Not A Nigerian?

    ARE YOU NOT A NIGERIAN? by Bayo Olupohunda

    Are you not a Nigerian? chronicles a country’s fourth attempt at democratic governance after many years of military dictatorship. Through his personal experiences and observations, Báyọ̀ Olúpohùndà captures the reality of Nigeria’s socio-political environment at the turn of the millennium, the collapse of dignity in service, and the ubiquitous “Nigerian factor” that creates entitlement. Are You Not A Nigerian? examines the lost opportunities, the disappointment of successive administrations, and the dilemma of a nation at a crossroads.

    3,500
  • Hot
    0 out of 5

    Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

     

    A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. Dear Ijeawele is Adichie’s letter of response.

    Here are fifteen invaluable suggestions–compelling, direct, wryly funny, and perceptive–for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can “allow” women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It will start a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today.

    1,000
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    Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions (Ankara cover)

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

     

    A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. Dear Ijeawele is Adichie’s letter of response.

    Here are fifteen invaluable suggestions–compelling, direct, wryly funny, and perceptive–for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can “allow” women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It will start a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today.

    1,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Fela: This Bitch of A Life

    by Carlos Moore

     

    African superstar, composer, singer, and musician, as well as mystic and political activist, Nigerian Fela Kuti, born in 1938, was controversy personified. He was swept to international celebrity on a wave of scandal and flamboyance, and when he died of AIDS in 1997, more than a million people attended his funeral. But what was he really like, this man who could as easily arouse violent hostility as he could unswerving loyalty?

    Carlos Moore’s unique biography, based on hours of conversation and told in Fela’s first-person vernacular, reveals the icon’s complex personality and tumultuous existence. Moore includes interviews with fifteen of his queens (wives); photos; and an updated discography.

    4,500
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    Ibadan: The Penkelemes Years; A Memoir: 1946 – 1965

    by Wole Soyinka

     

    Ibadan is the third volume in Wole Soyinka’s series of memoirs, the sequel to Ake and Isara. In a mixture of fact and fiction – to protect the innocent and nail the guilty and shape an often intolerable reality – it tells of the coming of age of a writer and political activist; and of a nation’s betrayal.

    4,000
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    Ìsarà: A Voyage Around “Essay”

    by Wole Soyinka

     

    The 1986 winner of the Nobel Prize in Literature–the first African to be awarded the prize–writes a highly incisive and deeply affecting re-creation of colonial Nigeria based on a cache of letters he discovered after his father’s death.

    4,000
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    Lagos: City of the Imagination

    by Kaye Whiteman

     

    Lagos is fast becoming a global city – a place people visit for curiosity and the vibe as much as for business or family. The mesmerising energy and intensity of the city have to be experienced to be understood. But what is the story of Lagos? When did the city begin? Who were the first inhabitants? When did it become the city of iniquity and wisdom that continues to confound all who encounters it? Who have been the key chroniclers of this real yet imaginary city?

    Veteran journalist and writer Kaye Whiteman has given us a gem that answers these questions and more. Lagos: City of the Imagination explains the origins of Lagos as both outpost of the Benin Empire and also the city run by the White Cap Chiefs. Whiteman shows that Lagos was always multicultural and cosmopolitan, with the Portuguese and later educated returnees from Sierra Leone and artisans from Brazil adding to the eclectic mix.

    6,500
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    Longthroat Memoirs: Soups, Sex and Nigerian Taste Buds

    by Yemisi Aribisala

     

    One of the most enduring myths on the Nigerian femme fatale – mammy-water, ‘winch’ or husband-snatcher – has to do with the cooking of fish stew … A woman can do what she likes with a man when she knows how to satisfy his appetite for food. Long throat Memoirs presents a sumptuous menu of essays about Nigerian food, lovingly presented by the nation’s top epicurean writer. As well as a mouth-watering appraisal of the cultural politics and erotics of Nigerian cuisine, it is therefore a series of love letters to the Nigerian palate. From innovations in soup, fish as aphrodisiac and the powerful seductions of the yam, Long Throat Memoirs examines the complexities, the peculiarities, the meticulousness, and the tactility of Nigerian food.

    5,500
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    Love Does Not Win Elections

    by Ayisha Osori

     

    Ayisha Osori ran for the house of Representatives under the People’s Democratic Party ticket. It was a short-lived adventure. She did not get the party’s nomination at the primaries and so fizzled her dream of representing her people in the AMAC/Bwari constituency in Abuja.

    But that experience has birthed a book and this is her story.

    4,000
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    New Cheese

    New Cheese is a true life story of a young girl’s brave journey into the unknown. Here, she shares her personal story of the mountain she climbed to encourage everyone who needs to start afresh, overcome restraints and go in search of a much needed change.

    2,000
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    One Day I Will Write About This Place

    by Binyavanga Wainaina

     

    In this vivid and compelling debut memoir, Wainaina takes us through his school days, his mother’s religious period, his failed attempt to study in South Africa as a computer programmer, a moving family reunion in Uganda, and his travels around Kenya.

    2,000
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    PositiveNaija Series 2017: Convocation of Green Eagles

    by Toju Micheal Ogbe

    PositiveNaija Series 2017: Convocation of Green Eagles is a historic and educational resource, which reliably informs the world of the positive excellence of Nigeria and Nigerians globally for the year 2017.

    Within the current context of our society, this publication champions a redefinition of the standards of Nigeria’s values-based system with core emphasis on the virtues of love, truth, justice, peace and wisdom – a testament of our conviction in the manifestation of Nigeria’s greatness.

    Aptly, it also serves as a creative and resourceful guide for best practices on planning, information management and communication for publishers, bloggers, writers, webmasters, digital marketers, etc.

    PositiveNaija Series 2017: Convocation of Green Eagles will therefore inspire you towards a refreshing and valuable sense of Nigerian patriotism, nation building and impactful scholarship.

    5,000
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    Safe House: Explorations in Creative Nonfiction

    by Ellah Wakatama Allfrey

     

    In a collection that ranges from travel writing and memoir to reportage and meditative essays, editor Ellah Wakatama Allfrey has brought together some of the most talented writers of creative nonfiction from across Africa.

    A Ghanaian explores the increasing influence of China across the region, a Kenyan student activist writes of exile in Kampala, a Liberian scientist shares her diary of the Ebola crisis; a Nigerian journalist travels to the north to meet a community at risk, a Kenyan travels to Senegal to interview a gay rights activist and a South African writer recounts a tale of family discord and murder in a remote seaside town.

    With an introductory essay by Ellah Allfrey, this anthology gathers new stories of contemporary Africa.

    5,000
  • 0 out of 5

    She Called Me Woman

    Edited by Azeenarh Mohammed, Chitra Nagarajan and Rafeeat Aliyu

    This stirring and intimate collection brings together 25 first hand accounts to paint a vivid portrait of what it means to be a queer Nigerian woman. These brave and beautifully-told stories of resistance and resilience reveal the realities of a community that will no longer be invisible. From the joy and excitement of first love, the agony of lost love and betrayal, memories of childhood games to addiction and suicide, She Called Me Woman shows us how Nigeria’s queer woman, in all their multitudes, attempt to build a life together.

    3,500
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    Soldiers of Fortune: A History of Nigeria (1983-1993)

    by Max Siollun

     

    “This book is the story of Nigeria’s political journey between January 1, 1984 and August 27, 1993. This is the story of how things fell apart.”

    The years between 1984 and 1993 were momentous for Nigeria. Military rule crafted the conditions and character of today’s society, forcing cataclysmic changes on the political, economic and religious landscape that nearly tore the country apart on several occasions. Soldiers of Fortune is a fast-paced, thrilling yet objective analysis of the major events of the Buhari and Babangida eras. It reveals the true story behind past controversies such as the annulment of the June 12 election, the execution of Mamman Vatsa, the foiled kidnapping of Umaru Dikko, the Orkar coups and the assassination of Dele Giwa.

    Historian and lawyer Max Siollun gives an intimate, fly-on-the-wall portrait of the major events and dramatis personae of the period. Soldiers of Fortune is a must-read for all Nigerians and Nigeria- watchers. Its dramatic narrative style will engage casual or academic readers alike.

    4,000
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    The Art of War

    by Sun Tzu

     

    Conflict is an inevitable part of life, according to this ancient Chinese classic of strategy, but everything necessary to deal with conflict wisely, honorably, victoriously, is already present within us. Compiled more than two thousand years ago by a mysterious warrior-philosopher, The Art of War is still perhaps the most prestigious and influential book of strategy in the world, as eagerly studied in Asia by modern politicians and executives as it has been by military leaders since ancient times.

    As a study of the anatomy of organizations in conflict, The Art of War applies to competition and conflict in general, on every level from the interpersonal to the international. Its aim is invincibility, victory without battle, and unassailable strength through understanding the physics, politics, and psychology of conflict.

    2,000
  • 0 out of 5

    The Chibok Girls: The Boko Haram Kidnappings and Islamist Militancy in Nigeria

    by Helon Habila

     

     

    On April 14, 2014, 276 girls from the Chibok Secondary School in northern Nigeria were kidnapped by Boko Haram, the world’s deadliest terrorist group. Most were never heard from again. Acclaimed Nigerian novelist Helon Habila, who grew up in northern Nigeria, returned to Chibok and gained intimate access to the families of the kidnapped to offer a devastating account of this tragedy that stunned the world.

    With compassion and deep understanding of historical context, Habila tells the stories of the girls and the anguish of their parents; chronicles the rise of Boko Haram and the Nigerian government’s inept response; and captures the indifference of the media and the international community whose attention has moved on.

    2,500
  • 0 out of 5

    The Pressure Cooker

    “Don’t you know you are a girl?”
    Nkiru Olumide-Ojo sets out, in this book, to respond to that question, and in the process, subvert its hidden “restraining” intent.
    In nine short and eminently readable chapters, The Pressure Cooker offers advice to women in the workplace. Advice that comes from Ms Olumide-Ojo’s lived experience—of motherhood, workplace politics, and climbing up that corporate ladder.
    3,500
  • 0 out of 5

    The Story of a Shipwrecked Sailor

    by Gabriel García Márquez

     

    This is Marquez’s account of a real-life event. In 1955, eight crew members of the destroyer Caldas, were swept into the Caribbean Sea. The sole survivor, Luis Alejandro Belasco, told the true version of the events to Marquez, causing great scandal at the time.

    4,000
  • 0 out of 5

    There Was a Country: A Personal History of Biafra

    by Chinua Achebe

     

    The defining experience of Chinua Achebe’s life was the Nigerian civil war, also known as the Biafran War, of 1967–1970. The conflict was infamous for its savage impact on the Biafran people, Chinua Achebe’s people, many of whom were starved to death after the Nigerian government blockaded their borders.

    He took the Biafran side in the conflict and served his government as a roving cultural ambassador, from which vantage he absorbed the war’s full horror. Immediately after, Achebe took refuge in an academic post in the United States, and for more than forty years he has maintained a considered silence on the events of those terrible years, addressing them only obliquely through his poetry.

    Now, decades in the making, comes a towering reckoning with one of modern Africa’s most fateful events, from a writer whose words and courage have left an enduring stamp on world literature.

    2,000