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    0 out of 5

    Nairobi Heat

    by Mũkoma wa Ngũgĩ

     

    A young and beautiful white woman is murdered in the US, and the prime suspect is former Rwandan school headmaster Joshua – a hero who had risked his life to save the innocent during Rwanda’s genocide. Ishmael, an African American detective, must investigate the case by plunging himself into Joshua’s past. He travels to Kenya, where Joshua once lived as a refugee, and finds himself unearthing his own African identity as he uncovers this violent crime.

    Kenyan author Mukoma wa Ngugi’s debut novel is a gripping and hard-hitting detective thriller that questions race, identity and class.

    2,000
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    News from Home

    by Sefi Atta

     

     

    From Zamfara up country, to the Niger Delta down south, with a finale in Africa’s most populous city, Lagos, this collection of stories and a novella are inspired by newspaper headlines and narrated by a range of Nigerian voices that are elevated to the realm of the sublime by Sefi Atta’s distinctive, clinical narrative skill.

    3,500
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    Tales of Freedom

    by Ben Okri

     

    Tales of Freedom offers a haunting necklace of images which flash and sparkle as the light shines on them. Quick and stimulating to read, but slowly burning in the memory, they offer a different, more transcendent way of looking at our extreme, gritty world.

    4,250
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    The Thing Around Your Neck

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

     

    In her most intimate and seamlessly crafted work to date, Adichie turns her penetrating eye on not only Nigeria but America, in twelve dazzling stories that explore the ties that bind men and women, parents and children, Africa and the United States.

    In “A Private Experience,” a medical student hides from a violent riot with a poor Muslim woman whose dignity and faith force her to confront the realities and fears she’s been pushing away. In “Tomorrow is Too Far,” a woman unlocks the devastating secret that surrounds her brother’s death. The young mother at the center of “Imitation” finds her comfortable life in Philadelphia threatened when she learns that her husband has moved his mistress into their Lagos home. And the title story depicts the choking loneliness of a Nigerian girl who moves to an America that turns out to be nothing like the country she expected; though falling in love brings her desires nearly within reach, a death in her homeland forces her to reexamine them.

    1,500