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    A Handful of Dust

    Stories from the 2013 Farafina Trust Creative Writing Workshop

     

    From the participants of the 2013 Farafina Trust Creative Writing Workshop, this collection aptly portrays the internal conflicts we suffer when the lines dividing opposing sides get blurred.

    2,000
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    And After Many Days

    by Jowhor Ile

     

    During the rainy season of 1995, in the bustling town of Port Harcourt, Nigeria, one family’s life is disrupted by the sudden disappearance of seventeen-year-old Paul Utu, beloved brother and son. As they grapple with the sudden loss of their darling boy, they embark on a painful and moving journey of immense power which changes their lives forever and shatters the fragile ecosystem of their once ordered family.

    2,500
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    Authentic Mama

    by Olonosen Louisa Ibhaze

    Paulina Omoregbe aka Iye Baby rules the night life of Nimbe town from her beer parlour with her magic touch and society connections. In spite of the constant dramas from fighting wives and jealous friends, she has succeeded in creating a good life for herself as a socialite and the President of the Imose Sisters Association of Accomplished and Distinguished Ladies.

    2,000
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    Born on a Tuesday

    by Elnathan John

     

    In far northwestern Nigeria, Dantala lives among a gang of street boys who sleep under a kuka tree. During the election, the boys are paid by the Small Party to cause trouble. When their attempt to burn down the opposition’s local headquarters ends in disaster, Dantala must run for his life, leaving his best friend behind. He makes his way to a mosque that provides him with food, shelter, and guidance. With his quick aptitude and modest nature, Dantala becomes a favored apprentice to the mosque’s sheikh. Before long, he is faced with a terrible conflict of loyalties, as one of the sheikh’s closest advisors begins to raise his own radical movement. When bloodshed erupts in the city around him, Dantala must decide what kind of Muslim—and what kind of man—he wants to be.

    Born on a Tuesday is a stirring, starkly rendered novel about a young boy struggling to find his place in a society that is fracturing along religious and political lines.

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    Easy Motion Tourist

    by Leye Adenle

     

    A woman’s mutilated body is discarded by the side of a club near one of the main hotels in Victoria Island. Collins, a bystander, is picked up by the police as a potential suspect. After experiencing the unpleasant realities of a Nigerian police cell, he is rescued by Amaka, a Pam Grier-esque Blaxploitation heroine with a saintly streak. As Collins discovers more of the darker aspects of what makes Lagos tick – including the clandestine trade in organs – he also falls slowly for Amaka. Little do they realise how the body parts business is wrapped up in the power and politics of the city.

    The novel features a motley cast of supporting characters, including a memorable duo of low-level Lagos gangsters, Knockout and Go-Slow. Easy Motion Tourist pulsates with the rhythms of Lagos, reeks of its open drains, and entertains from beginning to end. A modern thriller featuring a strong female protagonist, prepared to take on the Nigerian criminal world on her own.

    3,500
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    It Wasn’t Exactly Love

    Stories from the 2012 Farafina Trust Creative Writing Workshop

     

    A selection of participants from the 2012 Farafina Trust Creative Writing Workshop come together in this delightful collection of 13 stories that tell of humans and human relationships.

    Be Happy chronicles a woman’s journey to contentment in a marriage she has settled for. An adolescent is faced with a shocking reality while attending a Catholic boys’ school in A Taste of It. In An Autodidact’s Guide to Sex-Ed a woman contemplates the right time to introduce her children to sex. Domestic violence is explored in You Take Me for a Goat. Ladies Night tells of the escapades of a middle-aged married man in the city of Accra.

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    Like a Mule Bringing Ice Cream to the Sun

    by Sarah Ladipo Manyika

     

     

    Morayo Da Silva, a cosmopolitan Nigerian woman, lives in hip San Francisco. On the cusp of seventy-five, she is in good health and makes the most of it, enjoying road trips in her vintage Porsche, chatting to strangers, and recollecting characters from her favourite novels. Then she has a fall and her independence crumbles. Without the support of family, she relies on friends and chance encounters. As Morayo recounts her story, moving seamlessly between past and present, we meet Dawud, a charming Palestinian shopkeeper, Sage, a feisty, homeless Grateful Dead devotee, and Antonio, the poet whom Morayo desired more than her ambassador husband.
    A subtle story about ageing, friendship and loss, this is also a nuanced study of the erotic yearnings of an older woman

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    Longthroat Memoirs: Soups, Sex and Nigerian Taste Buds

    by Yemisi Aribisala

     

    One of the most enduring myths on the Nigerian femme fatale – mammy-water, ‘winch’ or husband-snatcher – has to do with the cooking of fish stew … A woman can do what she likes with a man when she knows how to satisfy his appetite for food. Long throat Memoirs presents a sumptuous menu of essays about Nigerian food, lovingly presented by the nation’s top epicurean writer. As well as a mouth-watering appraisal of the cultural politics and erotics of Nigerian cuisine, it is therefore a series of love letters to the Nigerian palate. From innovations in soup, fish as aphrodisiac and the powerful seductions of the yam, Long Throat Memoirs examines the complexities, the peculiarities, the meticulousness, and the tactility of Nigerian food.

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    Safe House: Explorations in Creative Nonfiction

    by Ellah Wakatama Allfrey

     

    In a collection that ranges from travel writing and memoir to reportage and meditative essays, editor Ellah Wakatama Allfrey has brought together some of the most talented writers of creative nonfiction from across Africa.

    A Ghanaian explores the increasing influence of China across the region, a Kenyan student activist writes of exile in Kampala, a Liberian scientist shares her diary of the Ebola crisis; a Nigerian journalist travels to the north to meet a community at risk, a Kenyan travels to Senegal to interview a gay rights activist and a South African writer recounts a tale of family discord and murder in a remote seaside town.

    With an introductory essay by Ellah Allfrey, this anthology gathers new stories of contemporary Africa.

    5,000
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    Taduno’s Song

    by Odafe Atogun

     

    The day a stained brown envelope arrives from Taduno’s homeland, he knows that the time has come to return from exile. Arriving full of trepidation, the musician discovers that his community no longer recognises him, believing that Taduno is dead. His girlfriend Lela has disappeared, taken away by government agents. As he wanders through his house in search of clues, he realises that any traces of his old life have been erased. All that was left of his life and himself are memories. But Taduno finds a new purpose: to unravel the mystery of his lost life and to find his lost love. Through this search, he comes to face a difficult decision: to sing for love or to sing for his people.

    Taduno’s Song is a moving tale of sacrifice, love and courage.

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    The Carnivorous City

    by Toni Kan

     

    Sabato Rabato aka Soni Dike is a Lagos big boy; a criminal turned grandee, with a beautiful wife, a sea-side mansion and a questionable fortune. Then one day he disappears and his car is found in a ditch, music blaring from the speakers. Soni’s older brother, Abel Dike, a teacher, arrives in Lagos to look for his missing brother. Abel is rapidly sucked into the unforgiving Lagos maelstrom where he has to navigate encounters with a motley cast of common criminals, deal with policemen all intent on getting a piece of the pie, and contend with his growing attraction to his brother’s wife.

    The Carnivorous City is a story about love, family and just desserts but it is above all, a tale about Lagos and the people who make the city by the lagoon what it is.

    3,700
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    The Chibok Girls: The Boko Haram Kidnappings and Islamist Militancy in Nigeria

    by Helon Habila

     

     

    On April 14, 2014, 276 girls from the Chibok Secondary School in northern Nigeria were kidnapped by Boko Haram, the world’s deadliest terrorist group. Most were never heard from again. Acclaimed Nigerian novelist Helon Habila, who grew up in northern Nigeria, returned to Chibok and gained intimate access to the families of the kidnapped to offer a devastating account of this tragedy that stunned the world.

    With compassion and deep understanding of historical context, Habila tells the stories of the girls and the anguish of their parents; chronicles the rise of Boko Haram and the Nigerian government’s inept response; and captures the indifference of the media and the international community whose attention has moved on.

    2,500
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    The Woman Next Door

    by Yewande Omotoso

     

    Hortensia James and Marion Agostino are neighbours. One is black, one white. Both are successful women with impressive careers. Both have recently been widowed. And both are sworn enemies, sharing hedge and hostility which they prune with a zeal that belies the fact that they are both over eighty.

    But one day an unforeseen event forces the women together. And gradually the bickering and sniping softens into lively debate, and from there into memories shared. But could these sparks of connection ever transform into friendship? Or is it too late to expect these two to change?

    2,000
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    What It Takes

    by Lola Akande

     

    What It Takes is a sad, vivid expose, of a typical Nigerian University doctorate programme that gleefully cannibalises the best of its own. It is a story of discouragement of excellent academic pursuits, depicting the prevalence of favouritism, ethnicity, nepotism, corruption, lust, needy culture and other negative tendencies currently ravaging the knowledge industry in Nigeria.

    The Heroine, Funto Oyewole, a middle-aged and ambitious woman, tells her own story about her dreams, hopes, aspirations, enthusiasms, disappointments and misery as a doctorate student, and how her zeal, high energy and enthusiasm are gradually replaced by frustration and despondency, which hasten her aging process, as her hope of earning a PhD through hard work becomes increasingly elusive.

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