• 0 out of 5

    A Woman’s Body is a Country

    by Dami Ajayi

     

    Dami Ajayi’s second volume of poems, A Woman’s Body is a Country, interrogates the ramifications of affection. A work of impressive artistry, these are poems of life turned inside out, where time cheats on writers, and the people and things at the brunt end of our oppressive pleasures come back to haunt us. Here is the poetry of the quotidian, a philosophic and profound interrogation of relationships, of words, of bodies and their burdens, of times and time.

    2,000
  • 3.00 out of 5

    An Abundance of Scorpions

    by Hadiza Isma El-Rufai

     

    Following a horrific tragedy, Tambaya leaves Kano for Accra to live with her brother, Aminu. Sadly, her dream of a new beginning is dashed when she can no longer endure the indignity she suffers at the hands of her brother’s new wife.

    Tambaya returns to northern Nigeria and soon finds work as a matron in an orphanage, under the watchful eye of the ruthless Miss Scholastica. Just when she begins to settle into her new life, an unexpected visit threatens to destroy everything she has worked so hard to build. Tambaya faces moral dilemmas on all sides, but she must stop her life from unravelling once again.

    Vulnerable, and surrounded by malice, corruption and greed, Tambaya struggles to shape her destiny. An Abundance of Scorpions charts one woman’s journey through grief and uncertainty to a road that leads to self-discovery, redemption and love. 

    3,500
  • 0 out of 5

    Are You Not A Nigerian?

    ARE YOU NOT A NIGERIAN? by Bayo Olupohunda

    Are you not a Nigerian? chronicles a country’s fourth attempt at democratic governance after many years of military dictatorship. Through his personal experiences and observations, Báyọ̀ Olúpohùndà captures the reality of Nigeria’s socio-political environment at the turn of the millennium, the collapse of dignity in service, and the ubiquitous “Nigerian factor” that creates entitlement. Are You Not A Nigerian? examines the lost opportunities, the disappointment of successive administrations, and the dilemma of a nation at a crossroads.

    3,500
  • 0 out of 5

    Birthmarked

    by Marvellous Micheal

     

    Mote

    Mote, a young Nigerian painter, believes she had found the love of her life: Jack, an American architect. Together, they survive the problems that stir up from their interracial union. However, when tragedy befalls their close-knit family of four, Mote is forced to relive the past—revealing harboured secrets and uncovering old truths.

    Ara
    Ara, having watched her father fire the shot that killed her only brother, is enraged and hell-bent on revealing what she had witnessed to anyone who cares to listen. She battles to reconcile the man she once called father and the man whom she saw murder his son. She will yet find out that they may have harboured a stranger in their home.

    Jack
    Jack finds himself living in the shadows of his life, caught up in a web of lies that threaten his life and his reality. Although he tries to find his way back, he soon finds himself making decisions that seem to draw him further away from the truth as he forms new bonds and allegiances. As time goes on, he finds that he is becoming the man he swore to kill.

    6,000
  • black and british book by david olusoga
    0 out of 5

    Black and British: A Forgotten History

    5,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

     

    A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. Dear Ijeawele is Adichie’s letter of response.

    Here are fifteen invaluable suggestions–compelling, direct, wryly funny, and perceptive–for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can “allow” women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It will start a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today.

    1,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Dear Ijeawele, or a Feminist Manifesto in Fifteen Suggestions (Ankara cover)

    by Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie

     

    A few years ago, Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie received a letter from a dear friend from childhood, asking her how to raise her baby girl as a feminist. Dear Ijeawele is Adichie’s letter of response.

    Here are fifteen invaluable suggestions–compelling, direct, wryly funny, and perceptive–for how to empower a daughter to become a strong, independent woman. From encouraging her to choose a helicopter, and not only a doll, as a toy if she so desires; having open conversations with her about clothes, makeup, and sexuality; debunking the myth that women are somehow biologically arranged to be in the kitchen making dinner, and that men can “allow” women to have full careers, Dear Ijeawele goes right to the heart of sexual politics in the twenty-first century. It will start a new and urgently needed conversation about what it really means to be a woman today.

    1,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Love Does Not Win Elections

    by Ayisha Osori

     

    Ayisha Osori ran for the house of Representatives under the People’s Democratic Party ticket. It was a short-lived adventure. She did not get the party’s nomination at the primaries and so fizzled her dream of representing her people in the AMAC/Bwari constituency in Abuja.

    But that experience has birthed a book and this is her story.

    4,000
  • 0 out of 5

    Purple Rain

     

    Purple rain is a touching story of a young lady that fell in love in the process of following her dreams (music), but had many ups and downs in her life. The trials she faced on her journey through life shaped her into a strong woman, not only for herself but for the society within which she found herself. Her story falls in line with the popular saying “when there’s life, there’s hope”.

    2,000
  • Hot
    3.00 out of 5

    Stay With Me

    by Ayobami Adebayo

     

    Yejide and Akin have been married since they met and fell in love at university. Though many expected Akin to take several wives, he and Yejide have always agreed: polygamy is not for them. But four years into their marriage–after consulting fertility doctors and healers, trying strange teas and unlikely cures–Yejide is still not pregnant. She assumes she still has time–until her family arrives on her doorstep with a young woman they introduce as Akin’s second wife. Furious, shocked, and livid with jealousy, Yejide knows the only way to save her marriage is to get pregnant. Which, finally, she does–but at a cost far greater than she could have dared to imagine.

    An electrifying novel of enormous emotional power, Stay With Me asks how much we can sacrifice for the sake of family.

    3,500
  • beginning of everything colourful book by onyeka nwelue on thebookdealerng
    0 out of 5

    The Beginning Of Everything Colourful

    Emperor Akihito and Empress Michiko are welcoming Spain’s King Felipe VI and Queen Letizia. Who are visiting Japan as state guests, at the Imperial Palace. With Crown Prince Naruhito and Prime Minister Shinzo Abe also attending a related event there. But there are two nameless people who are not happy with this visit. A Mexican musician, who hates the Spanish and a Japanese business man, who hates the Chinese.

    3,500
  • 0 out of 5

    The Farm

    by Adesuwa Ehinome Iluobe

     

    The Farm is a collection of stories which are reflections on Nigeria and her experiences. The Farm is the lead story, set in a rustic part of Nigeria, an unusual farm records uncommon success and productivity in its operations.

    Separated from her loved ones, Moremi is flung into an unfamiliar world that is highly expectant of her. Amidst fatal changes, bizarre alliances, quest for wealth and love, she finds an unlikely friend in Ugonna. Together they must do their part to ensure continued success of the Farm. With each choice they make, their lives unfolds before them until they stumble upon a shattering revelation that unsettles what little balance there is at the farm.

    In Elusion, Ese and Ibrahim take us on a thrilling journey that highlights the bond between the duo, which introduced them to each other’s peculiarities and uniqueness both in their cultural and religious differences. Their bond further grows into a formidable love tangle that thrives despite the awakening of terrorism in the country.

    Human showcases the struggle of a Mother confronted with protecting her son from the reality of stigmatization and keeping him from battering other children who tease him with as Afin; a term he demands his mother to explain.

    Asabe and Hassanah share a close knit friendship in Residue  that is almost torn apart by insatiable needs and an ailing country.

    The last story One Year is a story of a young girl whose missing friend has caused her family despair and misery.  It was first published by Brittle Paper, a leading African Literary e-mag.

    1,750
  • 0 out of 5

    What It Means When a Man Falls from the Sky

    by Lesley Nneka Arimah

     

    In Who Will Greet You at Home a woman desperate for a child weaves one out of hair, with unsettling results. In Wild, a disastrous night out shifts a teenager and her Nigerian cousin onto uneasy common ground. In The Future Looks Good, three generations of women are haunted by the ghosts of war, while in Light, a father struggles to protect and empower the daughter he loves. And in the title story, in a world ravaged by flood and riven by class, experts have discovered how to “fix the equation of a person” – with rippling, unforeseen repercussions.

    2,500
  • 0 out of 5

    When We Speak of Nothing

    by Olumide Popoola

     

    Best mates Karl and Abu are both 17 and live near Kings Cross. Its 2011 and racial tensions are set to explode across London. Abu is infatuated with gorgeous classmate Nalini but dares not speak to her. Meanwhile, Karl is the target of the local “wannabe” thugs just for being different.

    When Karl finds out his father lives in Nigeria, he decides that Port Harcourt is the best place to escape the sound and fury of London, and connect with a Dad he’s never known. Rejected on arrival, Karl befriends Nakale, an activist who wants to expose the ecocide in the Niger Delta to the world, and falls headlong for his feisty cousin Janoma. Meanwhile, the murder of Mark Duggan triggers a full-scale riot in London. Abu finds himself in its midst, leading to a near-tragedy that forces Karl to race back home.

    When We Speak of Nothing launches a powerful new voice onto the literary stage. The fluid prose, peppered with contemporary slang, captures what it means to be young, black and queer in London. If grime music were a novel, it would be this.

    3,500